Ankündigung

Einklappen
Keine Ankündigung bisher.

STAR TREK BEYOND (englisch)

Einklappen
X
  • Filter
  • Zeit
  • Anzeigen
Alles löschen
neue Beiträge

  • STAR TREK BEYOND (englisch)

    STAR TREK BEYOND
    created by Kai Brauns
    based upon STAR TREK created by Gene Roddenberry

    S1E00
    “Changing course”
    written by Kai Brauns
    Consultant: Uwe Heinzmann

    Teaser

    Captain's Log, Stardate: 128692.4. Our current mission is to protect the Romulan colony
    on Feldar III. Other Romulan colonies in the area have been attacked before
    by a group of Reman renegades. I am determined to get these pirates and deal with them
    as harshly as Starfleet regulations allow. It is better to teach them a lesson they will not forget
    than having to constantly watch over them.

    It was dark on the bridge of the U,S,S. TUCKER. There were several lightsources, but grey walls, black uniforms and the grim faces of the crew seemed to swallow it all. Captain Toral stared at the huge screen which was depicting a holographic image of outer space in front of the the ship. Despite his Vulcan heritage he felt an unfamiliar tension.

    To his right, his first officer was watching the sensors. So far the Trill had criticized almost any decision the captain has made but for once he kept quiet. He used to say it was a first officer´s duty to offer alternatives. Toral did not approve of this behaviour, and had he known this seemingly young man before, he would never have relied on the complimentary content of his Starfleet dossier.

    At last the first officer declared what everyone was waiting for. “Sensors read Reman battle cruiser at 5 million kilometers, closing in with raised shields and powered disruptor banks.”

    “Raise shields,” Toral commanded. “Red Alert. Phasers on target.”

    “Remans getting into phaser range, Sir,” announced Lieutenant M'rek from the tactical console. “Target set.”

    “Sir,” the Trill said. “We should hail them, warn them.”

    Toral suppressed an annoyed sigh. He had hoped the powered disruptor banks would be sufficient reason for a preemptive strike “Very well,” he said resignedly. “Open a frequency to the Remans.”

    “Frequencies open.”

    Toral cleared his throat before speaking. “This is the Federation Starship TUCKER. Feldar III is under our protection. You are ordered to stand down, or we will use lethal force.”

    There was a moment of tense silence.

    The Reman ship was now filling the big holographic screen. It was just an old Reman Warbird, being no real threat for the TUCKER, since the Remans hadn't been able to improve their starship technology since the downfall of the Romulan Empire.

    Suddenly the disruptor banks at the wings of the Warbird began to glow and two beams of light lanced at the Federation cruiser.

    “The Remans have fired,” M'rek stated the obvious.

    “Evasive maneuvers,” the captain ordered. “Fire at will.”

    The TUCKER dodged the incoming fire and retaliated with several phaser blasts. The Remans were not as quick as the TUCKER, and their shields collapsed under the phaser´s impact force . Suddenly, the Warbird banked around and jumped to Warp.

    “Follow them,” commanded Toral, standing out of his chair and stepping closer to the main screen. “We are not letting them get away to come back after our departure.”

    “Sir,” replied the Trill, “if we leave now, the colony will be without protection.”

    “They are getting away,” Toral dismissed his first officer.

    “There are more than a thousand civilians down there.”

    Toral turned around to face the young man. “Commander, that's enough. You are to stand down.”

    A heartbeat later Toral was lying unconcious on the floor while the young Trill fixed his gaze on the Cardassian helmsman.

    “We will not follow them,” the commander said determinedly.

    Unsure what to do the Cardassian finally nodded. “Aye, Commander Dax.”


    Act 1

    “He punched me in the face, Admiral,” Toral stated, having a hard time checking his temper and keeping his Vulcan calmness up. “It was a severe breach of Starfleet regulations, not to mention highly illogical.”

    “I realize that,” the admiral on the small screen in the captain's ready room replied. “But in the end, Dax was right. Only minutes after the first Reman Warbird warped out, two others decloaked and would have annihilated the colony if you'd have had your way and followed the other ship. The man's instincts saved a lot of lives today.”

    “He may have been right this time,” the Vulcan admitted grudgingly. “But he is still guilty of insubordination and assault on a superior officer. Next time, his 'instincts' may be wrong.” Toral paused for a moment. “Anyway, I cannot work with this officer any longer. In my opinion he should be court-martialed. If this will not happen, he must at least be transferred away from my ship. As long as he is on the TUCKER, he will remain in the brig.”

    The admiral nodded. “This I understand, of course. As it turns out, our new head of Starfleet Command has plans to deal with Dax though I am not sure they will suit you.”

    ****

    Three days later Commander Jelon Dax sat outside the offices of Starfleet Command in San Francisco, Earth. He was unsure what to expect here and wondered why he wasn´t in a holding cell awaiting his sentence and most probably a dishonorable discharge.

    Despite his deep thoughts concerning his future, Dax still noticed the headquarters of Starfleet had gotten a paint-job, feeling much brighter and warmer than before. The huge windows showed the idyllic garden. It may be late september, but it was still nice and warm outside.

    Finally the secretary approached and announced that the admiral was ready to receive him now. Dax rose and stepped towards the large, old-fashioned non-mechanical double door. After pushing down the handle, the door swung wide and Dax stared in surprise at the diminutive figure outlined in front of a panoramic window behind the desk.

    “Come in, Commander,” the old Ferengi said.

    Dax complied and closed the door.

    The Ferengi walked towards him with his saw-toothed grin. “It's good to see you again, Dax,” he said and shook the perplexed Trill's hand.

    “Nog?!”

    “Oh, you got the new body and I'm the unrecognizable,” the small admiral joked.

    Dax's perplexity was replaced by a sudden joy of reunion. “Nog, what are you doing here?”

    “Well, it's my office, you know.”

    There was the puzzlement again. “What do you mean, this is... When did they make you head of Starfleet?”

    “Oh, well, I'm not. Not yet officially, anyway. The official ceremony is in ten days. But come, sit.”

    They went to the side of the large office where two couches and a small table waited for them.

    “So,” Nog continued the conversation after they sat down. “You're Jelon, now.”

    “Yes,” Dax replied. “My tenth host. Probably my last.”

    “You know,” Nog said. “I've known two former Daxes, but this is the first time I've seen you with a male host. A bit weird, but luckily, I'm not young enough to care much for females anymore, anyway.”

    They laughed. “Yes, it takes most people a while to adjust. And you, you've come quite far, haven't you.”

    “Ah, well, first Ferengi to join Starfleet and survive long enough to get this old. I guess they had no choice but make me the new leader. Still, I wish my father was still alive to see this.”

    Dax smiled sympathetically. “He would be proud. I know he supported your decision to join Starfleet right from the start.”

    “Yeah,” Nog said nostalgically. “Hey, remember when he bought me a cadet uniform, not knowing I'd get them for free at the academy?!”

    They both laughed. “Like I said, he was quite supportive.”

    Nog nodded smiling. But then he leaned back and straightened his uniform. “Back to official business. I've heard, you had quite an argument with Captain Toral a few days ago.”

    Dax swallowed hard. He had almost forgotten about that. “Well, yeah. I guess you know the facts. If I hadn't taken command, more than a thousand Romulan colonists would be dead.”

    “So, you don't regret your decision.”

    Dax shook his head. “Affirmative. I may have ruined my Starfleet career, but I'd still do it again.”

    Nog nodded. “That's good.” He sat up and scratched his left lobe. “Dax, what´s your opinion on Starfleet´s present status-quo?”

    Again, Dax was perplexed. What had this to do with anything? “Uh, well, I guess, it's not the good old days, anymore. It's all about regulations and standing ready for the next war to break out.”

    “Quite right,” Nog said, standing up and starting to pace the room randomly. “We used to be explorers, seeking new life, 'going boldly where no man has gone before' as Zefram Cochrane put it. And that's what I signed up for eighty years ago. But now, we've become simple soldiers waiting for the next battle.” He stopped and turned to face Dax. “But that's about to change.”

    Dax shot his old friend a puzzled look. “What are you going to do?”

    “Me and a few other people in Starfleet Command are determined to change the direction of Starfleet. We want to renew our original mission. And we have a new flagship, the second of the new Magellan-class, to represent this new direction.”

    “A ship?”

    “Yes. Right on time for the 300th anniversary of the maiden flight of the first Starfleet ship. And I want a captain to go with it, someone who will go out and find new civilizations, who is not married to Starfleet regulations but will follow his instincts.” He paused for a moment. “I want you, Dax.”

    Dax had to let this sink in. “Let me get this straight,” he said. “I knocked out my captain, and instead of kicking my butt out of the fleet, you offer me a promotion and the command of a new flagship to visit unknown planets and see stuff no one else has ever seen before.”

    Nog nodded. “That about sums it up.” He laughed. “So, are you gonna do it?”

    A wide grin took over Dax's face. “Hell, yeah.”


    Act 2

    Serok was staring out of the window over the skyline of the Romulan colony of Luron VI . He had exactly twelve minutes and 29 seconds left to spend on this planet before getting beamed on board the HERALD. Rather than taking a walk and seeing the last of his home for a long time, he stayed inside the apartment.

    He did not feel any appreciation for this colony or most of its people. Most Romulans had not treated him very well. They made fun of him, insulted him, and sometimes, when one of them wanted to impress the others that person would physically attack him. Even among his relatives he had few friends and as much as he tried, he could never shake the emotion of fear and pain from himself.

    Maybe he would have succeeded being raised on his father´s world among his own kin. Maybe then he would be like them: Cool, logical, emotionless.

    A colleague at his former post once asked Serok why he would ever return here despite hating this place so much. Well, for all the misery it had caused him, there was something – someone – that always brought him back.

    Serok turned around to look at his mother. “I will write whenever I can,” he said.

    T'fawn smiled at her son. “I'm sure you will, even though you should have better things to do.”

    The young Half-Vulcan stepped to her side and put his hand on her shoulder. “Nothing is better than thinking about you, mother.” He looked deeply into her eyes, saw a tear escaping and the smile disappearing from her face. At this moment, he became very aware of the state of emotion he was in. Quickly he withdrew his hand and tried to push his feelings away. “I will find the time to write.”

    “HERALD to Commander Serok,” his comm-badge sounded saving him from the danger of another emotional outburst.

    He tapped on the Starfleet insignia sewn into the fabric of his uniform jacket. “Serok here,” he replied.

    “We are ready to beam you aboard, Commander,” said the female voice of a transporter chief on the Starship.
    Serok sighed, picked up his luggage, and took one last glance at the woman that was the one good thing about his childhood. “Live long and prosper, mother,” he said.

    She smiled again. “You, too, Serok.”

    He nodded. “Serok to HERALD. One to beam up.”

    T'fawn watched as her son desintegrated into atoms until a second later, he had completely vanished. She sat down, staring at the spot he had been in just a moment ago. And she let the tears run down her face.

    ****

    Dax looked at his image in the mirror. He definitely liked the new uniform. The old one had been black and dull, only the collar showing color. Now the jacket was all color, even the shoulder area that was of a different material than the rest. And they had really returned to the glory days with the color scheme for the distinction of the divisions, with gold for command and navigation, blue for medical and science, and red for operations and security.
    Dax touched the rank pins on his black collar, two on each side. He would have to get used to the fourth one.
    The door signal beeped, interrupting the new captain in his thoughts. “Enter,” he said out loud so the computer would open the door to the visitor.

    In came a dark skinned young woman, probably of Indian descent,dressed in a golden uniform jacket, but with only three rank pins of which one was halfway colored black. “Hello, sir,” she said. “I am Lieutenant Commander Sagu.”

    “Ah, yes,” Dax acknowledged. “My helmsman.”

    “Yes, sir,” she answered with a smile. “If you are ready, I will bring you aboard the ship.”

    Dax motioned for his baggage lying on the bed of the one-room quarters. Packing had not been much of an issue. Since his arrival from the TUCKER, he had figured there was no reason to unpack his personal belongings, as he wouldn't be staying long anyway. He just replaced his black uniform jackets. “I am ready, Commander,” he said, grabbing his bags and turning towards her.

    It took them only a few minutes to get from the guest quarters of the Space-dock in Earth's orbit to the inner shuttle bay of the station. Since the foundation of Starfleet, it had been a tradition for the Captain of a new ship to come aboard by shuttle rather than transporter beam.

    After boarding their craft, Dax and Sagu sat down in the cockpit. “Your file praises your piloting skills, Commander,” the Trill said. “I am looking forward to seeing you in action.”

    “Thank you, sir,” Sagu replied. “Though I doubt it's something you haven't seen before. Living ten lives, several as a Starfleet officer, most of them traveling in space, one as a pilot yourself even, you must have known some good helmsmen.”

    “So you've been reading my file, as well.”

    “I'm sorry, if you are offended by this,” Sagu said apologetically.

    “Not in the least,” Dax calmed her. “It just shows that you're not indifferent to your commanding officer and if I get to read your file, it's only fair if you also read mine.”

    “Yes, but you must have done it in order to choose your officers, right?”

    “Actually, I didn't get to do that,” Dax said. “I came in so late in the game, Admiral Nog picked the senior officers himself.”

    “Well,” said the Lieutenant Commander, “I can see why you were offered this command. You're not the kind of man I'm used to being my captain. And if I may say so, sir, I appreciate that.”

    “Thanks,” Dax said. “And if you pilot my ship as good as this shuttle, I like you being my helmsman, too.”

    “Guess that's what they call 'mutual liking',” Sagu blurted. As soon as it was out, she showed her embarrassment. “I'm sorry, sir, that last remark was inappropriate.”

    Dax smiled. “Take it easy, Commander,” he said. “It's not like anyone's hearing us, and we are not in any emergency .”

    “You're definitely not the kind of captain I'm used to.”

    “Say, does our conversation qualify as flirting?” asked Dax.

    The woman shot him a puzzled look. “I'm not flirting with you.”

    Dax nodded acknowledment. “According to your files you're Muslim. Just how religious are you?”
    “I am not the kind of woman practicing casual sex,” she answered in a playful tone.

    “Oh, dammit,” he said. “You definitely read my file.”

    They laughed until Lieutenant Commander Sagu nodded towards the front viewport. “There she is.”

    Among the gray and silver starships that filled the Space-dock, the cream-colored hull was like a shining beacon in an otherwise dark space. It also had a classic look to it, reminding Dax of the old Constitution-Class with the warp nacelles jutting out of the engineering-section, upwards so the nacelles themselves were even higher than the saucer section. It was almost 800 meters long and 100 meters high, the circular primary hull measuring 350 meters in diameter.

    At the neck of the ship, connecting the saucer-section with the secondary hull was a large installation, just above the navigational deflector. Dax recognized it as a Yamato-type phaser, directly connected to the main reactor. It was a last resort weapon powerful enough to destroy another Starship with a single blast, but draining the ship's main power in the process, leaving it virtually defenseless with only emergency power for two minutes. It had been standard for newly commissioned Starfleet heavy cruisers for about a year now.

    They flew higher, swooping around the upper side of of the primary hull. And there they were. The letters to define the new direction Starfleet was about to take. The return to the origins. U.S.S. ENTERPRISE NCC-1701-I.


    Act 3

    Upon debarkation they were greeted by several officers and crewmen standing in rows at the side of their boat. “Captain on deck,“ shouted a rather tall redclad Andorian . Within a moment's notice the officers and crewmen straightened .

    Dax had witnessed this procedure quite often during his various careers in Starfleet, but this particular perspective was rather new to him. The Jelon part of him was about to panic, just now realizing the pressure he would be under from now on, but the symbiont calmed him down. “At ease,“ he said towards the crew. His crew.

    They loosened up a bit. Not to say they were really at ease, but they did not look like statues anymore.

    Dax paced the front row and looked at the crew. “Alright,“ he started the mandatory welcoming speech . “I want to be honest with you. I did not choose you for the job you're supposed to do. I wasn't asked. Most of you were on this assignment long before I ever heard of it. And I realize most likely none of you signed up for this having ever heard of me. All I know of you is what little I had time to read from your files. But that's just fine.

    “It's fine we have not yet made anything of such historical significance anyone ever heard of us. It's fine, because we will change that. What awaits us on our mission, what we are about to experience, will be part of the history books. Do not expect this mission to be easy. We have a lot to live up to. We are supposed to bring Starfleet back to its roots and to live up to the name of our ship. That´s no easy task. But we will prevail!. Just try your best and I will do the same.“

    He stopped in front of a redclad Terran Lieutenant Commander “Achim Benger, chief of engineering, I presume.“
    The man nodded. „Yes, sir.“

    “According to your file, you are quite good at what you're doing. Wouldn't have picked someone else, even if I had a choice.”

    Benger smiled enthusiastically. “Thank you, sir. I'll do my best not to disappoint you.”

    Dax stepped in front of the Andorian. “And you must be Lieutenant Commander Tahor.”

    “Yes, sir,” shouted the tall blue-skinned alien as if Dax stood half a mile away, straightening up “Tactical officer and chief of security, sir!”

    Dax raised an eyebrow, more than slightly amused by the performance. “Yes,” he said. “I feel safer already.” He turned to the crew. “That'll be all for now. Dismissed.”

    The crewmen scattered , returning to their posts. When Tahor was about to do the same, Dax stopped him. “Commander, I have noticed that not all senior officers were present.”

    “Yes, sir,” Tahor replied at a lower volume than before, his antennae moving sideways. “Commander Serok is not yet aboard. We will rendezvous the HERALD in the Romulan sector in two days.”

    “Yes, I know,” Dax replied. “But what about our chief medical officer? He's supposed to have arrived yesterday.”

    “So he did, Captain,” Tahor began, but hesitated before continuing. “When I told him to be present at your arrival, he was … dismissive.”

    Dax's surprise showed on his face. “Dismissive,” he repeated.

    “Well, sir, Dr. Peters is not very enthusiastic about Starfleet traditions.” He paused, thinking about if he should reveal the next detail or not. He decided to do it. “Actually, he is not very enthusiastic about Starfleet at all.”

    Dax raised an eyebrow. “This assignment is getting more and more intriguing.” He turned to Commander Sagu, who had been trailing him. “What´s this human proverb: If the mountain won't come to Muhammad, Muhammad must go to the mountain. You go to the bridge, prepare to clear Space-dock.”

    “Aye, sir,” she replied.

    Dax then turned towards the door. “I'll go and visit our enthusiasm-lacking friend in sickbay.”

    ****

    Arriving in sickbay, Dax approached a nurse. “Excuse me, I'm looking for Dr. Peters.”

    “Yes, Dr. Peters is in Lab One, sir. This way.” The Bajoran woman waved him to a door on the right of the large room.

    Dax nodded. „Thank you.“ He left the nurse to her work and went straight for Medical Laboratory 1.

    When the captain entered the room, a middle-aged man with dark skin and a grumpy look on his face turned around and met Dax's eye. “Who are you?” he asked harshly.

    “Had you been in the shuttle bay like you were supposed to you would already know the answer.”

    “Ah,” the man said. “So, you're the captain.”

    “And you, I presume, are Dr. Bryan Peters.”

    “Listen,” the doctor said while turning back to his instruments. “I'm not good with Starfleet regulations. I heard you're not that strict about them, and I really need to get to know my new working place.”

    “I don't follow regulations if they don't work within a situation,” Dax said. “And I do like to meet my senior officers.”

    “Well, here we are, meeting each other.”

    Dax wasn't going to leave it at that.. “Your absence from the ceremony could be interpreted as a lack of respect.”

    “Whoever would view the situation this way would come to think you having a problem of self-esteem,” Peters retorted and turned around again to see Dax's reaction.

    The captain remained calm. “It was not respect for me I was talking about, but respect for Starfleet.”

    Peters smirked, picking up a medical tricorder and calibrating it. “In that case, they'd be right to view my absence this way.”

    “You don't respect Starfleet,” Dax remarked.

    “Hell, for the most part, I don't even like Starfleet. Space travel, militaristic behavior, stupid 'welcome the captain on board' traditions. Dammit, I'm a doctor, not an astronaut.”

    “Well, you're a Starfleet medical officer, so you're kinda both.”

    “Smart-ass. What the hell was I thinking joining the fleet?”

    “I don't know,” Dax replied. “What were you thinking?”

    “That question was rhetorical.” Peters sighed, putting the tricorder down. “I am an explorer. A medical explorer. I'm good at studying unknown diseases, improvising cures. Unfortunately, Starfleet offers the best opportunity to put these talents to use ” He looked at Dax. “I'm not a soldier. I don't like to discipline people, and I hate getting orders. If you're looking for a lapdog following you around saying 'Yessir' to anything you utter, go look for a new doctor.”

    Dax smiled. “You remind me of another doctor I once met, about 200 years ago.” He thought for a moment. “And also of the father of a friend, actually.”

    “Oh, great,” Peters said sarcastically. “Are you about to tell more tales from your previous lives? I can't wait to listen to the old man in a young body.”

    “You may not call me 'old man',” Dax reprimanded him. Then he relaxed and offered his hand to the doctor. “But you may call me Jelon.”

    Peters hesitated, then grabbed the captain's hand and shook it. “Bryan. Or Doc, whatever suits you.”

    “Ooh, 'Doc'. That's a classic. I'm tempted.” They let go of their hands. “Listen, I'm not looking for a lapdog, and I'm beginning to like you. Things on board will be far less militaristic than you may be used to in Starfleet. But I need to uphold at least a little discipline.”

    Peters nodded. “Fair enough.”

    “And I want you to tell me when I'm wrong.”

    Peters smirked. “When you're wrong, do I get to punch you in the face?”

    “Oh, that one's gonna stick, huh?” Dax shook his head laughing. “Well, you're welcome to try.”

    “Never mind, wouldn't go along with my oath as a doctor.”

    “Okay,” Dax said. “Listen, I'm needed on the bridge, we're going to clear the dock. But why don't you come to my quarters tonight and we'll drink to the start of our mission to explore strange new diseases, to seek out new viral life and new bacterial civilizations.”

    “Sounds good,” Peters said, way more friendly than before. “I could bring some Saurian Brandy.” Just then a thought crossed his mind. “But, uh, this is not a sexual thing, is it?”

    Dax raised his eye-brows. “What? Why?”

    “See, I was chatting with Commander Sagu earlier ...”

    “Well, no, but if you want, we can make it one.”

    “Let's say we won't, then I'll be there.”

    ****

    Dax exited the turbolift and stepped onto the bridge. It was a real beauty, a white-walled circle, about 15 meters in diameter. At the front there was the large view-screen showing a three-dimensional picture of the inner Space-dock. There was an outer ring with stations for engineering, communications, science, tactical, and others. Two small steps lead down to the inner bridge, with the helm at the front and the command chair in the middle. On each side of the command chair was a marked space where guest chairs would materialize when needed.

    Dax noticed Sagu sitting on the left side of the helm, a young female Deltan ensign to her right. Tahor occupied the tactical station in the outer ring. As soon as he noticed Dax, he jumped up and straightened himself. “Captain on the bridge,” he shouted.

    Immediately, everyone rose to their feet, turned to Dax and straightened up.

    “At ease,” Dax said. When everyone was seated, he turned to Tahor. “I hope that's not how I will be greeted every time I walk in here.”

    Tahor nodded. “Aye, sir.”

    “Good,” Dax said and stepped toward his command chair. “Commander Sagu, are we ready to depart?”

    “All systems ready,” Sagu stated. “We have permission to clear the dock.”

    “Alright, then.” Dax sat down in his chair, ran his fingers over the controls of the chair's arms. He swiveled around and took a good look at everyone. Finally facing the helm again, he said: “Let's get going. Aft thruster, full speed.”


    Act 4

    Serok entered the ready room of Captain Leroy. “You requested to see me, Captain?”

    William Leroy looked up from the small screen on his desk and met the Vulcan´s eyes. “Sit down, Commander.” It was more order than invitation. When Serok was seated opposite to him, the captain started: “Half an hour ago, our long-range scanners have detected a space anomaly in the former Romulus system. We have orders to investigate.”

    “Intriguing,” Serok said. “Could you be more specific on the subject?”

    “Well, my science officer could explain better, you can ask him later on. He'd probably appreciate any suggestions you might have. For now, it seems that the location of this anomaly is exactly where the red-matter incident happened.”

    “That incident created the anomaly which swallowed the Hobus nova responsible for the destruction of Romulus,” Serok remarked.

    “That's the one,” Leroy replied.

    “Sir, what about the ENTERPRISE? We were supposed to rendezvous with her in the Dimarek system.”

    “Well,” Leroy said, “our plan has changed. We have already contacted the ENTERPRISE. She'll meet us at the anomaly.” He leaned forward. “Are you sure you want to get involved in this investigation? Considering it all goes back to the destruction of your home world.”

    “I have to correct you, sir,” Serok replied. “Romulus is not my home world. I was born and raised on Luron VI and studied at Starfleet Academy on Earth. Romulus was destroyed long before my birth and can therefore not be my home.”

    “Yeah, well, but your maternal family comes from Romulus, doesn't it?”

    “And if you go back long enough, my maternal family also originated on Vulcan. I do not see your point.”

    Leroy nodded. “You're definitely more Vulcan than Romulan, I give you that. Well, that's all, Commander. You're dismissed.”

    ****

    Captain's Log, Stardate: 128729.1. Our rendezvous with the HERALD has been
    relocated due to an anomaly detected in the Romulus area. There, the last remaining senior
    officer of the ENTERPRISE will join us in the form of XO Serok. By his
    own request, he will not only serve as my executive officer, but also as science officer.

    “We are approaching the Romulus area, Captain,” Sagu announced.

    Dax sat up straight. “How long till we will rendezvous with the HERALD?”

    “Two hours, sir,” Sagu answered.

    Peters, who stood next to the command chair, eyed the captain. “What's wrong, Jelon?”

    “Just a little nervous,” Dax replied. “Maybe it isn't such a good idea of me working with another Vulcan ...”

    “... considering how your last cooperation with a Vulcan ended,” the doctor finished. “Relax, Jelon. He's half Romulan. How bad can he be. Besides, this time you are in command.”

    “You've got a point,” Dax said. “About that 'me in command' part, not the only half Vulcan part.”

    “Come on, you just say that because you don't want to sound racist,” Peters teased.

    “What, you got something against Vulcans?”

    “Me? No. How could I? I've never really known a Vulcan.”

    “Seriously?”

    “Well, I have seen them, maybe examined one or two through the years,” Peters paused and sighed. “But, no, I've never actually learned to know one.”

    “You're pulling my leg,” Dax protested. “You're a Starfleet medical officer, you must have worked with a Vulcan before.”

    “Just didn't happen,” Peters said.

    “What about the Academy? There must have been Vulcans attending your classes.”

    “None I remember.”

    “But they're born scientists.”

    Peters smirked. “Sure, they're great scientists. Just not good physicians.”

    “Now you sound racist.”

    “It's true, though. I mean, have you ever heard of a Vulcan doctor?”

    Dax thought about it. “I think I've read t there was a Vulcan medical officer on the EXCALIBUR once.”

    “Right,” Peters said. “Once.”

    “What about the Vulcan Medical Institute? Their work on memory restoration?”

    Peters shrugged his shoulders. “Overrated.”

    “You're really pulling my leg, aren't you?”

    “Depends,” Peters replied. “Still nervous?”

    “Feeling better.”

    ****

    Ensign Sina stood in the living area of the Officer's quarters, which furniture seemed rather spartan, watching a sparkle of atoms coalescing into the form of a tall Vulcan male in a black Starfleet uniform and two standard Starfleet traveling bags. When the beaming process had ended she nodded smiling towards him. “Welcome aboard, Commander,” the young Deltan said. “I'm Ensign Sina.”

    “Thank you, Ensign,” Serok replied, looking around . “These are my new quarters.”

    It was a statement more than a question, but Sina still answered. “Yes, I hope they are to your satisfaction.”

    “They are larger than I am used to,” Serok stated.

    “If you want, I'll see if I can find quarters that are more to your liking,” Sina said hastily.

    He looked at her. “No need, Ensign. I'll adjust.”

    Sina nodded and motioned the commander to follow her into the bedroom. “You will find several uniforms of the new design in the closet. They should match your measurements.”

    “I'm sure they will fit,” Serok said, noticing the Ensign's nervousness. “May I ask what your function on this ship is?”
    The bald woman hesitated, groping for the right words. “My main post is navigator, but I am supplementing other departments from time to time. I still haven't decided which direction to go.”

    “A generalist,” Serok noted. “It certainly has its benefits. Most captains are generalists.”

    “Well, I'm far from being a captain,” Sina said, blushing.

    “I did not say otherwise,” Serok replied.

    The blushing turned to embarrassment, as the ensign realized that the Vulcan's comment was not meant as a compliment. “Yes, sir,” she said, trying not to let her emotions take control. “The captain asked to see you as soon as possible.”

    ****

    Serok entered the captain's ready room. “You requested to see me, Captain?”

    Dax looked up at the Vulcan, who was now wearing the new blue uniform. “Ah, yes. Commander Serok. Welcome aboard.”

    “Thank you, Captain,” Serok said.

    “Take a seat,” Dax waved to one of the chairs on the other side of his desk.

    The commander followed the invitation.

    Dax scratched his jaw. “You, uh, wanted to be both chief science officer and XO. You think you can handle both jobs at the same time?”

    “If I didn't, I would not have applied for both positions,” Serok said calmly.

    “Yes, of course,” the Trill said. “That would be the logical assumption, wouldn't it?”

    If Serok noticed the humor of the captain's comment, he did not show. “Do you wish me to resign from one of these positions?”

    “No,” Dax said quickly. “If you say you can handle it, I'll trust you on that. For now, anyway.” His fingers tapped the desk nervously. “Say, do you know any Vulcan physicians?”

    Serok's face showed only the slightest surprise. “Sir?”

    “Oh, never mind,” Dax said quickly. “So, what's this anomaly all about?”

    “We witnessed an energy construct forming itself. Apparently, it has been doing this since the red matter was released to the Hobus nova, but it has just recently gained a magnitude that makes it detectable by our scanners. It is a most intriguing development, as both red matter and the anomaly causing the Hobus nova to take on its size are still rather mysterious to us, therefore we cannot tell if this new energy construct is a result of the red matter reacting to the Hobus anomaly or vice versa. There's also the possibility there is no connection at all, but it is logical to presume such a connection for the moment. As it is, the construct seems to take the form of a subspace matrix.”

    “Subspace matrix,” Dax repeated. “Are you telling me that this construct is going to give birth to a wormhole?”

    “It is a bit early to say, but it is quite possible,” the science officer answered. “Nonetheless, Captain Leroy is already planning to claim the proposed wormhole for the Federation.”

    “Figures,” Dax said. “Wormholes are pretty valuable. The wormhole to the Gamma Quadrant made Bajor into a major player.”

    “It could prove to be of great value, but even if there will be a wormhole, we cannot predict where it will lead.”

    At that moment, they were interrupted by a siren and Sagu's voice over the intercom: “Red alert! Captain Dax to the bridge!”

    Both Dax and Serok jumped to their feet and headed towards the door. Arriving on the bridge, Dax's eyes were fixed to the view-screen showing several Reman ships, a few of them were Scimitar-class Warbirds. „Status report,“ he requested, stepping to his chair without taking his eyes from the screen. Serok took over the science station.

    “Twelve Reman ships, three of them Scimitar-class,” Tahor barked “They must have been around for some time now and just de-cloaked. Our shields and weapon systems are fully powered.”

    “Someone open a frequency to the HERALD,” Dax ordered. “Someone else, hail the Remans, request their business here.”

    “We receive a message from one of the Scimitars,” Tahor said.

    “Play,” Dax said.

    The holographic image of a Reman appeared on the viewscreen, a humanoid with black and blue skin, bald pate and bat-like eyes and ears. He began to speak in a dark, deep voice: “I am Viceroy Shonaz, speaking on behalf of Praetor Ziron. We claim the developing wormhole in the name of the Reman Star Empire.”


    Act 5

    Dax stood up from his command chair and stepped towards the holographic Reman. “The Reman Star Empire?” he repeated. But before he could ask any questions, the holographic figure of Captain Leroy appeared.

    “This is Captain William Leroy of the Federation Starship HERALD,” he said in a very belligerent tone. “The Romulan sector is under protection of the Federation and therefore it is us who claim the wormhole. We will not surrender it, especially not to a government we don't even recognize.”

    Dax tried to reason with them. “Please, we do not want this situation to escalate. Not prematurely, anyway.” The last part was meant for Leroy. “I propose we get together to talk this over.”

    Leroy stared at Dax as if the Trill was a total idiot. “Talk this over? These are Remans, for god's sake.”

    “Yes, they are,” Dax replied. “And this sector happens to be their home.”

    The viceroy looked with a hint of surprise at Dax. “It seems there is at least one of you worthy talking to. I accept your offer to negotiate, but I am not so naïve as to go onboard a Federation vessel.”

    “Okay, let's talk now,” Dax said quickly. To Leroy he said: “There's no sense in fighting them, Captain Leroy. They outnumber us by far.”

    “Yes,” the viceroy called out. “We could defeat you in a matter of minutes.”

    “If you'd do that, though,” Dax said to the viceroy, “The Federation would declare war in a minute, and you'd be overrun by Starfleet in a matter of days. That can't be in the best interest of the Reman Star Empire.”

    Shonaz looked at Dax. He knew the Trill spoke the truth, but was too proud to admit it.

    “As I said,” Leroy cut in, “this sector is under protection of the Federation.”

    “And as I said,” Dax shot back, “this is their home. We cannot take this from them without abandoning the ideals on which the Federation was founded.”

    “But we haven't recognized their government.”

    “Nonetheless, it is there, and we have to deal with it.” He turned back to the Reman. “Still, the Remans have benefited from Federation presence. This whole sector would have become part of the Klingon Empire long ago, if it weren't for Starfleet patrolling the area. And the Klingons will come as soon as we leave the sector in your hand.”

    “You propose we simply give it to you?”

    “No,” Dax said, trying to think fast. Suddenly, an idea crossed his mind. “On the contrary, I propose a joint jurisdiction.”

    Shonaz looked at him in total surprise. He seemed to think about it. “Remans and Federation working together?”

    “This is a mistake,” Leroy said.

    “Stuff it,” Dax simply said. “As far as I see, this is the only way to resolve this thing without starting a war.”

    “There is truth in what you say,” the Reman admitted. “We will grant you access to the wormhole, if you will do the same for us.”

    “Agreed,” Dax said.

    “Starfleet will never stand for this,” Leroy said.

    “Knowing the Admiral, I think it will,” Dax replied.

    ****

    Two hours later, Dax's prognosis proved right. The HERALD was to stay with the energy construct, with two more Starships scheduled to arrive within the day. The ENTERPRISE, on the other hand, would continue her mission elsewhere.

    “That was pretty darn close,” Peters said. “How the hell did you do that?”

    Dax shrugged his shoulders. “I've got some experience in diplomacy. Well, my symbiont part does. I just hope it won't be for nothing and this construct will actually become a wormhole.”

    “I believe it will, Captain,” Serok said. “If my calculations are correct, the transformation of the construct into a wormhole will be complete in 194 days.”

    “Well,” Peters said, “gives you something to look forward to.”

    “But that's in six months,” Dax said. “Until then, there's still a whole lot of space in our neighborhood we have yet to explore.”

    “Really?” Peters looked at him in surprise. “I would have thought with thousands of ships over the last 300 years, we would have covered it by now.”

    “Well, let me tell you something,” Dax said. “Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the corridor to sickbay, but that's just peanuts compared to space.”

    “I was afraid of that,” was Peters's replied drily.


    Space. The Final Frontier.
    These are the Voyages of a new Starship ENTERPRISE.
    Her renewed Mission:
    To explore strange new Worlds,
    to seek out new Life
    and new Civilizations,
    to boldly go where no one has gone before,
    and beyond.



    Don't miss the premier of season 1 coming this June:
    "A Mind of Their own"


    Liebe Leser,

    was ihr gerade gelesen habt war die Pilot-Episode für meine Fanfiction-Serie “Star Trek Beyond”. Aber es gibt so viele verschiedene Fanfiction-Projekte um Star Trek, was unterscheidet meines von den anderen?

    Der Unterschied ist das Ziel. “Star Trek Beyond” ist das, wie ich mir eine neue Star Trek-Serie vorstelle. Während die meisten Trek-Fanfictions sich mit den bereits bestehenden Charakteren auseinandersetzen, sich mit den großen Mächten der Föderation, den Romulanern, den Klingonen und den Borg befassen, soll “Star Trek Beyond” wieder das tun, was Star Trek ausgemacht hat. Zurück zu den Wurzeln bei gleichzeitigem Fortschreiten. Als “Star Trek” begann, gab es noch kein Star Trek-Universum. Es gab ein Raumschiff und seine Crew, und jede Episode ein neues, unglaubliches Abenteuer. Klingonen, Romulaner, die langjährigen Kriege und die Politik der Föderation kamen allesamt später hinzu. Mir fiel leider auf, dass sich Fandom und Franchise aber mehr und mehr mit dem Trek-Universum beschäftigten und dabei das Konzept “Star Trek” aus den Augen verloren. Und dies will ich ändern.
    Dazu war meiner Ansicht nach kein Reboot nötig. Das originale Universum ist vollkommen in Ordnung, man muss nur die bereits zu bekannte Umgebung verlassen. Das 24. Jahrhundert ist bereits in drei TV-Serien mit jeweils sieben Staffeln, sowie in unzähligen Romanen, Comics und Fan-Projekten erforscht worden. Was mir nötig schien war ein erneuter Sprung in die Zukunft, wie er bereits zwischen der Original-Serie und “The Next Generation” stattfand. Und dies gab mir die Gelegenheit, die Kursänderung, die ich mit diesem Projekt anstrebe, auch innerhalb der Geschichte zu verdeutlichen. Starfleet musste sich erneuern, wie es Star Trek tun muss. Die Rückkehr zu alter Stärke, zu alten Idealen und dem “Sense of Wonder”. Es ist wieder Zeit, dorthin zu gehen, wo nie ein Mensch gewesen ist, anstatt immer nur zurückzukehren, wo andere schon gewesen sind, nur um zu sehen ob sich da irgendwas verändert hat.

    Womit ich nicht sagen will, dass es nicht auch in dieser neuen Serie zusammenhängende Handlungsbögen geben wird. Zwar wird (fast) jede Episode eine in sich geschlossene Geschichte sein, aber die Charaktere und das Universum um sie herum wird sich verändern und weiterentwickeln. Der Pakt der Föderation mit den Remanern wird Konsequenzen haben, für das Universum dieser Serie wie auch für die Charaktere. Und ebenso werden spätere Ereignisse ihre Konsequenzen haben. Es gibt keinen Reset-Button.

    Zu den Charakteren: Ich bin mit voller Absicht zum klassischen Dreier-Gestirn zurückgekehrt. Es ist kein Unfall oder Ideenlosigkeit, dass Captain Dax, Commander Serok und Dr. Peters an Kirk, Spock und McCoy erinnern. Das ist volle Absicht und eine bewusste kreative Entscheidung. Denn Mehr als alle anderen Charaktere symbolisiert dieses klassische Dreiergestirn den Charakter von “Star Trek”. Gleichzeitig wollte ich keine bloßen Kopien der bereits bekannten Charaktere abliefern. Es gibt große Unterschiede zwischen diesen neuen Charakteren und ihren Vorbildern, die sich im Laufe der Serie mehr und mehr herausstellen werden. Und die weiteren Charaktere haben ihre ganz eigene Art und werden sich dem Leser auch immer weiter öffnen.

    Doch etwas entscheidendes fehlt noch. Was das klassische Star Trek wirklich ausgemacht hat, war die Vielseitigkeit der Serie. Ein Autor allein kann eine solche Vielseitigkeit nicht liefern.

    Deshalb lade ich euch dazu ein, euch an “Star Trek Beyond” zu beteiligen. Mein Ziel ist nicht, die Serie als alleiniger Autor zu schaffen, sondern eher die Rolle eines “Executive Producer” oder “Story Editor” einzunehmen. Zwar werde ich die erste Staffel noch größtenteils allein bestreiten, doch es steht bereits eine Episode von einem anderen Autoren fest. Wenn ihr euch also beteiligen wollt, eine Idee für eine Trek-typische Kurzgeschichte habt, schickt mir eure Ideen per PN oder Email. Wenn sie mir gefallen, wird eure Episode unter eurem Namen (written by …) veröffentlicht.

    Liefert aber nicht gleich fertige Episoden ab, sondern gebt erstmal in wenigen Sätzen eure Idee an, da ich nicht garantieren kann, dass ich diese Episode auch wirklich ins Programm nehme. Möglicherweise widerspricht eure Idee meinen Plänen für den weiteren Verlauf der Serie. Vielleicht ist bereits eine Episode in Arbeit, die eurer Idee zu ähnlich ist. Und wenn ich eure Idee ins Programm nehme, so müsste ich euch ein paar Vorgaben zur weiteren Entwicklung des übergreifenden Handlungsbogens und der Charaktere machen, weshalb es Sinn macht, dass ihr eure Episode erst schreibt, wenn ihr diese Vorgaben kennt.

    Die Serie wird außerdem auf Englisch veröffentlicht. Eine deutschsprachige Veröffentlichung könnte bei entsprechender Nachfrage folgen, aber die Erstveröffentlichung wird auf Englisch stattfinden. Wenn eure Englischkenntnisse nicht ausreichen, so ist das nicht schlimm. Eure Episode wird auf jeden Fall Korrektur gelesen, bevor sie veröffentlicht wird.

    Ich hoffe sehr, dass ihr der Serie eine Chance gebt, sowohl als Leser, wie auch (eventuell) als Mit-Autor.

    Bis zur letzten Grenze, und darüber hinaus,

    Kai Brauns
    Zuletzt geändert von Kai "the spy"; 11.04.2011, 01:57.
    Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
    Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

  • #2
    Ich hoffe es ist okay, dass ich hier einfach reinposte.

    Interessanter Anfang und das obewohl das Konzept so ziemlich das absolute Gegenteil von meinen eigenen Ideen und Vorstellungen ist (sprich: Militarisierung der Sternenflotte, Schwerpunkt auf politischen und charakterzentrierten Handlungsbögen). Ich würde gerne was dazu beitragen, aber aus nahe liegenden Gründen weiß ich nicht, ob ich das adäquat könnte, also belasse ich es für den Anfang mal bei einem kurzen Pro und Kontra aus meiner Sicht.

    Pro:

    - Der Stil als solches ist wirklich großartig und aus meiner Sicht gibt es da keine wirklichen Verbesserungsmöglichkeiten.
    - Die Brücke durch einen Dax-Wirt als Hauptcharakter ist ein sehr gelungener Übergang von der TNG-Ära und eine gute Idee, um sowohl ein halbwegs bekanntes Gesicht in der Crew zu haben, als auch genug Zeit zu haben, um sich thematisch von der TNG-Ära zu losen. In zwei Worten: Spagat gelungen.
    - Die beiläufige Erwähnung der Religion von Sagu, kombiniert mit ihrer (wahrscheinlich) indischen Herkunft ist ebenfalls etwas, das mit gefällt, obwohl es eigentlich gegen meine eigenen Vorstellungen von Trek läuft. Zum einen fügt die Erwähnung der Religion etwas Hintergrund zu dem Charakter hinzu, andererseits hast du klugerweise das Klischee vermieden, sie Nahost-stämmig zu machen.
    - Der Arzt macht ebenfalls einen soliden Eindruck. Gewissermaßen der ST2009-McCoy hoch zwei, was die Einstellung zur Raumfahrt (bzw. Starfleet) angeht. Das birgt eine Menge Konfliktpotenzial und macht aus ihm einen idealen Kandidaten für den "Teufels Advokat"-Posten, wann immer jemand dem Captain widersprechen muss/soll (so du das so aufbauen willst). Von den Charakteren die du bisher eingeführt hast, hat er IMO definitiv am meisten Persönlichkeit und das nach relativ wenigen Sätzen.
    - Der Endsatz, das "... and beyond." ist ein netter Touch und eine gute Variation.

    Contra:

    - Enterprise. Jaja, ich weiß, Symbolcharakter. Aber es gibt so viele mögliche Namen, da wird es irgendwann mal langweilig, immer den einen selben als Heldenschiff zu sehen.
    - Dreigestirn. Du hast deine Gründe klar dargestellt, aber wirklich überzeugt davon dass es funktioniert bin ich noch nicht. Kommt auch darauf an wie sich das entwickelt, vor allem mit dem "McCoy'scher als McCoy"-Arzt könnten sich da ein paar gute Gelegenheiten ergeben.

    Kommentar


    • #3
      Zitat von Drakespawn Beitrag anzeigen
      Ich hoffe es ist okay, dass ich hier einfach reinposte.
      Hab' ich gar kein Problem mit. Und Feedback ist immer Willkommen.

      Interessanter Anfang und das obewohl das Konzept so ziemlich das absolute Gegenteil von meinen eigenen Ideen und Vorstellungen ist (sprich: Militarisierung der Sternenflotte, Schwerpunkt auf politischen und charakterzentrierten Handlungsbögen). Ich würde gerne was dazu beitragen, aber aus nahe liegenden Gründen weiß ich nicht, ob ich das adäquat könnte, ...
      Eilt ja nicht, die erste Staffel ist sowieso gut durchgeplant (vor allem, da ich von meinem Kumpel Uwe Heinzmann, der mir als Berater insbesondere für die englische Sprache zur Seite steht und der bereits erwähnte erste "Gastautor" ist, mir eben mitgeteilt hat, dass sein Beitrag wohl auf eine Doppelfolge hinauslaufen wird). Und überhaupt, das Ziel ist ja Vielfalt, der eine oder andere Polit-Thriller innerhalb der Serie dürfte schon funktionieren. Sollte halt nur nicht Überhand nehmen, aber die Gefahr dürfte wohl nicht bestehen (nicht solange ich die Kontrolle habe ).

      ... also belasse ich es für den Anfang mal bei einem kurzen Pro und Kontra aus meiner Sicht.

      Pro:

      - Der Stil als solches ist wirklich großartig und aus meiner Sicht gibt es da keine wirklichen Verbesserungsmöglichkeiten.
      Das Kompliment gebe ich an Uwe Heinzmann weiter, der mir wie gesagt bei der Sprache sehr geholfen hat. Ich hatte mein Englisch eigentlich für sehr gut gehalten, aber was er noch an Verbesserungen angebracht hat, will ich nicht unter den Tisch kehren. Ohne ihn wäre der Stil nur halb so gut.

      - Die Brücke durch einen Dax-Wirt als Hauptcharakter ist ein sehr gelungener Übergang von der TNG-Ära und eine gute Idee, um sowohl ein halbwegs bekanntes Gesicht in der Crew zu haben, als auch genug Zeit zu haben, um sich thematisch von der TNG-Ära zu losen. In zwei Worten: Spagat gelungen.
      Das war eine längere Entwicklung im Planungsstadium. Ich war irgendwie mal an einem Alien als Captain interessiert. Die erste Idee war ein Vulkanier, aber letztlich funktionieren Vulkanier eben nicht als Hauptfigur, sondern nur als "Sidekick" (nicht abwertend gemeint). Außerdem war ja mein Gedankengang sehr vom Visuellen geprägt, da es ja im Prinzip eine TV-Serie in Prosa sein sollte. Es sollte also auch ein leichter Einstieg und eine schnelle Identifikation möglich sein, und ein sehr menschlich aussehender Alien (ohne Stirnmuster oder ähnlichem) wäre da von Vorteil. Ein Trill sieht eben sehr menschlich aus, die Flecken könnten beim Gelegenheitszuschauer auch als Tattoo durchgehen (siehe DS9: Past Tense). Und wenn schon ein Trill, dann auch ein "Joined Trill" (weiß gerade nicht, wie da die dt. Übersetzung war). Und von da war dann die Idee, dass es Dax sein könnte, nicht mehr weit.

      - Die beiläufige Erwähnung der Religion von Sagu, kombiniert mit ihrer (wahrscheinlich) indischen Herkunft ist ebenfalls etwas, das mit gefällt, obwohl es eigentlich gegen meine eigenen Vorstellungen von Trek läuft. Zum einen fügt die Erwähnung der Religion etwas Hintergrund zu dem Charakter hinzu, andererseits hast du klugerweise das Klischee vermieden, sie Nahost-stämmig zu machen.
      Es wirkt zwar oft, als wäre Religion in der Menschheit der Trek-Zukunft ausgestorben, aber ich sehe dafür einfach keine Begründung. Warum sollte Religion plötzlich weggehen? Außerdem war ein Ziel ja die Rückkehr zu alten Idealen, und waren auf der Original-Enterprise eben noch Russen und Asiaten die Symbolfiguren, so ist es heute eben eine muslimische Figur (und dass sie nicht nur muslimisch, sondern auch eine Frau ist, hebt das Ganze noch auf ein höheres Level).
      Und zu der indischen Abstammung bin ich über die Inspiration für Sagu, die Schauspielerin Rekha Sharma (nBSG), gekommen.

      - Der Arzt macht ebenfalls einen soliden Eindruck. Gewissermaßen der ST2009-McCoy hoch zwei, was die Einstellung zur Raumfahrt (bzw. Starfleet) angeht. Das birgt eine Menge Konfliktpotenzial und macht aus ihm einen idealen Kandidaten für den "Teufels Advokat"-Posten, wann immer jemand dem Captain widersprechen muss/soll (so du das so aufbauen willst). Von den Charakteren die du bisher eingeführt hast, hat er IMO definitiv am meisten Persönlichkeit und das nach relativ wenigen Sätzen.
      Ist wohl kein Zufall, dass McCoy meine Lieblingsfigur aus der Original-Serie ist. Auf die Ähnlichkeiten der Figuren habe ich ja selbstironisch auch innerhalb der Geschichte aufmerksam gemacht (Dax: "You remind me of ..."). Eine weitere Inspiration für diese Figur war Joseph Sisko und dessen Darsteller Brock Peters.

      - Der Endsatz, das "... and beyond." ist ein netter Touch und eine gute Variation.
      Ja, "Another Generation" hätte wohl nicht soviel Klang. Der Titel ist inspiriert durch die Animationsserie "Batman Beyond", die vom Batman der Zukunft handelte. Da meine Serie einen neuen Sprung in die Zukunft beinhaltete, hielt ich das für ganz passend. Und mit dem Wurmloch gibt es ja dann auch einen inhaltlichen Bezug (und wer das für einen Spoiler hält, ist zu faul zum denken). Und den Intro-Monolog entsprechend anzupassen erschien mir nur konsequent.

      Contra:

      - Enterprise. Jaja, ich weiß, Symbolcharakter. Aber es gibt so viele mögliche Namen, da wird es irgendwann mal langweilig, immer den einen selben als Heldenschiff zu sehen.
      - Dreigestirn. Du hast deine Gründe klar dargestellt, aber wirklich überzeugt davon dass es funktioniert bin ich noch nicht. Kommt auch darauf an wie sich das entwickelt, vor allem mit dem "McCoy'scher als McCoy"-Arzt könnten sich da ein paar gute Gelegenheiten ergeben.
      Was soll ich sagen. Ich stehe auf Ikonen.
      Und die Unterschiede zwischen dem alten Dreiergestirn und dem neuen werden schon noch deutlich, auch wenn's vielleicht ein bisschen dauert.

      Noch etwas, was ich wohl im Eingangspost vergessen hatte: Was ihr in dieser Serie nicht finden werdet sind Holodeck-Episoden. J. Michael Straczynski und Bryce Zabel hatten es in ihrem Treatment für ihr leider nicht verwirklichtes ST-Reboot auf den Punkt gebracht: Wenn es eines Holodecks bedarf, um Reisen in ferne Sternensysteme aufregend und interessant zu machen, dann läuft etwas falsch.
      Es gibt zwar noch Holodecks (bzw. inzwischen auch Holokabinen in den Quartieren der höheren Offiziere, 3x3x2 Meter), aber die werden nicht handlungsrelevant sein.
      Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
      Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

      Kommentar


      • #4
        Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
        Das war eine längere Entwicklung im Planungsstadium. Ich war irgendwie mal an einem Alien als Captain interessiert. Die erste Idee war ein Vulkanier, aber letztlich funktionieren Vulkanier eben nicht als Hauptfigur, sondern nur als "Sidekick" (nicht abwertend gemeint). Außerdem war ja mein Gedankengang sehr vom Visuellen geprägt, da es ja im Prinzip eine TV-Serie in Prosa sein sollte. Es sollte also auch ein leichter Einstieg und eine schnelle Identifikation möglich sein, und ein sehr menschlich aussehender Alien (ohne Stirnmuster oder ähnlichem) wäre da von Vorteil. Ein Trill sieht eben sehr menschlich aus, die Flecken könnten beim Gelegenheitszuschauer auch als Tattoo durchgehen (siehe DS9: Past Tense). Und wenn schon ein Trill, dann auch ein "Joined Trill" (weiß gerade nicht, wie da die dt. Übersetzung war). Und von da war dann die Idee, dass es Dax sein könnte, nicht mehr weit.
        Immer interessant zu hören, was für Ideen in die Planung eingeflossen sind.

        Es wirkt zwar oft, als wäre Religion in der Menschheit der Trek-Zukunft ausgestorben, aber ich sehe dafür einfach keine Begründung. Warum sollte Religion plötzlich weggehen?
        Wenn ich dazu mal aus meinem eigenen Fundus zitieren darf (obwohl diese Diskussion hier eigentlich nicht wirklich hingehört):

        Ja, die Föderation machte ein Aushängeschild aus ihrer Akzeptanz aller kultureller Wege. Das galt besonders für Religionen, deren Anhänger meist geradezu allergisch auf unverhohlene Kritik reagierten, aber eins stand dennoch als anthropologischer Beinahe-Fakt im Raum: Eine raumfahrende Zivilisation hatte in der überwältigenden Mehrheit der Fälle eine intellektuelle Reifung durchlaufen, in deren Verlauf rationale Denkweisen kulturell verwurzelten Aberglauben verdrängten. Auf der Erde waren institutionalisierte Religionen de facto nicht mehr existent. Glaube war etwas sehr viel individuelleres geworden als noch vor vierhundert Jahren und die Einflüsse verschiedener Religionen waren mittlerweile so weit ineinander verschwommen, dass nur noch Historiker sagen konnten, welches Element ursprünglich von woher kam.
        Das ist in etwa meine eigene Ansicht, allerdings etwas ausgeschmückt, insbesondere mit dem Verschwinden der "institutionalisierten Religionen".

        Der Titel ist inspiriert durch die Animationsserie "Batman Beyond", die vom Batman der Zukunft handelte.
        War meine erste Interpretation ja doch richtig, gut zu wissen. Die Wortwahl fiel mir auf, insbesondere da du mir hier im Forum schon öfter als Comic-Kenner aufgefallen bist und ich hatte eine grobe Vermutung, dass der Titel genau daher stammt.

        Solange der Captain (bzw. der Wirt-Teil) sich nicht als ein von Sektion 31 produzierter, quasi-geklonter Kirk-Nachfolger herausstellt...
        Obwohl, die Idee gefällt mir sogar ein wenig, wenn ich ehrlich bin.

        Und den Intro-Monolog entsprechend anzupassen erschien mir nur konsequent.
        Angesichts dessen, was du dir zum Ziel gesetzt hast ist das stilistisch gesehen sogar sehr passend.

        Und die Unterschiede zwischen dem alten Dreiergestirn und dem neuen werden schon noch deutlich, auch wenn's vielleicht ein bisschen dauert.
        Ich bin gespannt.

        Noch etwas, was ich wohl im Eingangspost vergessen hatte: Was ihr in dieser Serie nicht finden werdet sind Holodeck-Episoden. J. Michael Straczynski und Bryce Zabel hatten es in ihrem Treatment für ihr leider nicht verwirklichtes ST-Reboot auf den Punkt gebracht: Wenn es eines Holodecks bedarf, um Reisen in ferne Sternensysteme aufregend und interessant zu machen, dann läuft etwas falsch.
        Es gibt zwar noch Holodecks (bzw. inzwischen auch Holokabinen in den Quartieren der höheren Offiziere, 3x3x2 Meter), aber die werden nicht handlungsrelevant sein.
        Ist auch ein Punkt an dem ich dir zustimme. Das Holodeck sollte bahndelt werden wie der Warpantrieb: Ein technisches Gimmick, das man in Stories einbringen kann, aber man sollte keine Stories NUR darauf aufbauen.

        Kommentar


        • #5
          Zitat von Drakespawn Beitrag anzeigen
          Immer interessant zu hören, was für Ideen in die Planung eingeflossen sind.
          Da bist du bei mir richtig. In der Hinsicht bin ich nämlich ziemlich narzistisch veranlagt und liebe es über meine Ideen und ihre Entwicklungen zu erzählen. Wenn es möglich wäre, Audio-Kommentare Prosa hinzuzufügen, würde es wohl auch mit jeder Episode was von mir zu hören geben.

          Wenn ich dazu mal aus meinem eigenen Fundus zitieren darf (obwohl diese Diskussion hier eigentlich nicht wirklich hingehört):



          Das ist in etwa meine eigene Ansicht, allerdings etwas ausgeschmückt, insbesondere mit dem Verschwinden der "institutionalisierten Religionen".
          Interessanter Gedanke. So in etwa würde ich die Sache eigentlich auch sehen. Allerdings dürfte es selbst bei persönlicherer Glaubensentscheidung auch im 25. Jahrhundert noch Gruppen von Christen, Muslimen, Buddhisten, Hindu, etc. geben.

          War meine erste Interpretation ja doch richtig, gut zu wissen. Die Wortwahl fiel mir auf, insbesondere da du mir hier im Forum schon öfter als Comic-Kenner aufgefallen bist und ich hatte eine grobe Vermutung, dass der Titel genau daher stammt.
          Wer mich länger im Auge behält, kann mich offenbar leichter durchschauen, als ich dachte.

          Solange der Captain (bzw. der Wirt-Teil) sich nicht als ein von Sektion 31 produzierter, quasi-geklonter Kirk-Nachfolger herausstellt...
          Obwohl, die Idee gefällt mir sogar ein wenig, wenn ich ehrlich bin.
          Diese Idee überlasse ich dir für eines deiner Projekte. In STB wird sowas garantiert nicht vorkommen, da Sektion 31 so ziemlich gegen die ganze Grundidee von STB geht. Falls Sektion 31 tatsächlich mal vorkommen sollte, dann nur um endgültig beseitigt zu werden.

          Angesichts dessen, was du dir zum Ziel gesetzt hast ist das stilistisch gesehen sogar sehr passend.
          Danke!

          Ich bin gespannt.
          Sehr erfreulich.

          Ist auch ein Punkt an dem ich dir zustimme. Das Holodeck sollte bahndelt werden wie der Warpantrieb: Ein technisches Gimmick, das man in Stories einbringen kann, aber man sollte keine Stories NUR darauf aufbauen.
          Der Vergleich, den ich eher anstellen würde, ist die Rolle von Fernsehen in einer Gegenwarts-Serie. Es ist da, jeder hat sowas, jeder benutzt es, aber es spielt nur selten eine Rolle, und schon gar keine größere.
          Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
          Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

          Kommentar


          • #6
            Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
            Da bist du bei mir richtig. In der Hinsicht bin ich nämlich ziemlich narzistisch veranlagt und liebe es über meine Ideen und ihre Entwicklungen zu erzählen. Wenn es möglich wäre, Audio-Kommentare Prosa hinzuzufügen, würde es wohl auch mit jeder Episode was von mir zu hören geben.
            Ich erkenne mich da irgendwie gerade selbst wieder...

            Interessanter Gedanke. So in etwa würde ich die Sache eigentlich auch sehen. Allerdings dürfte es selbst bei persönlicherer Glaubensentscheidung auch im 25. Jahrhundert noch Gruppen von Christen, Muslimen, Buddhisten, Hindu, etc. geben.
            Ist natürlich möglich, aber ich sehe zum einen Fundamentalismus (egal welcher Religion) und zum anderen größere Dachorganisationen (wie den Papst und die katholische Kirche als Institution) als nicht mehr existent an. Zudem (das wurde in Star Trek immer vernachlässigt, wogegen Mass Effect z.B. das explizit erwähnt) sich viele Menschen von anderen Spezies "importierten" Glaubensrichtungen zugewandt oder sie mit menschlichen Religionen vermischt haben.

            Diese Idee überlasse ich dir für eines deiner Projekte.
            War mehr als nicht-ganz-so-ernster Seitenhieb auf Amanda Wallers "Batman Beyond"-Projekt aus JLU gedacht, das dann ja Terry McGinnis produzierte. Und die DCAU-Version von Cadmus passt zu Sektion 31 ja wie die Faust aufs Auge.

            In STB wird sowas garantiert nicht vorkommen, da Sektion 31 so ziemlich gegen die ganze Grundidee von STB geht. Falls Sektion 31 tatsächlich mal vorkommen sollte, dann nur um endgültig beseitigt zu werden.
            Ich seh schon, wir schreiben qusi ziemlich genau in entgegengesetzte Richtungen, was aber auch mal ganz interessant zu verfolgen ist.

            Ich behandle in meiner eigenen aktuellen Story S31 sehr tiefgehend. Zwar als Antagonisten, aber solche mit guten Begründungen - wie TVTropes es so schön nennt: "Well-Intentioned Extremists". Alleine weil ich die Situation interessant finde, dass die Moral für die Protagonisten spricht, die tatsächlichen Umstände (bzw. der Pragmatismus) aber eher für die Antagonisten.

            Der Vergleich, den ich eher anstellen würde, ist die Rolle von Fernsehen in einer Gegenwarts-Serie. Es ist da, jeder hat sowas, jeder benutzt es, aber es spielt nur selten eine Rolle, und schon gar keine größere.
            Na gut, ich bin etwas technikverliebt, mir rutschen dann des öfteren schonmal ellenlange Beschreibungen dazwischen, selbst wenn sie nicht plotrelevant sind, insofern würde ich wahrscheinlich über die Definition von "eine Rolle spielen" streiten.

            Kommentar


            • #7
              Zitat von Drakespawn Beitrag anzeigen
              Ich erkenne mich da irgendwie gerade selbst wieder...
              Da haben wir wohl beide ein bisschen von Stan Lee oder Dr. Gideon Seyetik in uns. "What were we talking about?" - "You." - "Of course, my favorite subject!"

              Ist natürlich möglich, aber ich sehe zum einen Fundamentalismus (egal welcher Religion) und zum anderen größere Dachorganisationen (wie den Papst und die katholische Kirche als Institution) als nicht mehr existent an. Zudem (das wurde in Star Trek immer vernachlässigt, wogegen Mass Effect z.B. das explizit erwähnt) sich viele Menschen von anderen Spezies "importierten" Glaubensrichtungen zugewandt oder sie mit menschlichen Religionen vermischt haben.
              Würde ich auch so sehen. Allerdings werde ich in STB keine großartigen Analysen darüber anstellen, wie der Stand der irdischen Religionen im 25. Jahrhundert ist, denn wir wollen ja dorthin "wo nie ein Mensch zuvor gewesen ist".

              War mehr als nicht-ganz-so-ernster Seitenhieb auf Amanda Wallers "Batman Beyond"-Projekt aus JLU gedacht, das dann ja Terry McGinnis produzierte. Und die DCAU-Version von Cadmus passt zu Sektion 31 ja wie die Faust aufs Auge.
              Das es scherzhaft gemeint war, hatte ich wohl verstanden, aber den Bezug zu "Batman Beyond" hatte ich da irgendwie nicht hergestellt. Da hatte ich wohl ein Brett vorm Kopf.

              Ich seh schon, wir schreiben qusi ziemlich genau in entgegengesetzte Richtungen, was aber auch mal ganz interessant zu verfolgen ist.

              Ich behandle in meiner eigenen aktuellen Story S31 sehr tiefgehend. Zwar als Antagonisten, aber solche mit guten Begründungen - wie TVTropes es so schön nennt: "Well-Intentioned Extremists". Alleine weil ich die Situation interessant finde, dass die Moral für die Protagonisten spricht, die tatsächlichen Umstände (bzw. der Pragmatismus) aber eher für die Antagonisten.
              Für mich ist Sektion 31 eben ein klarer Fall von "Trek Universe vs. Trek Concept". Und da ich dem Konzept den Vorrang gebe, werde ich mich eben auch nicht mit S31 beschäftigen.
              Wenn allerdings jemand eine gute Idee für eine Gastepisode hat ...

              Na gut, ich bin etwas technikverliebt, mir rutschen dann des öfteren schonmal ellenlange Beschreibungen dazwischen, selbst wenn sie nicht plotrelevant sind, insofern würde ich wahrscheinlich über die Definition von "eine Rolle spielen" streiten.
              Das ist auch etwas, was ich zumindest bei meinen Episoden auf ein Minimum reduzieren will. Technobabble wird es zwar auch geben (Benger muss ja irgendwas sagen dürfen), aber wie gesagt, auf ein Minimum reduziert. Allein schon, weil ich persönlich ohne den Technobabble Generator ziemlich auf geschmissen wäre.
              Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
              Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

              Kommentar


              • #8
                Also mich hast du mit deiner Idee und der ersten "Episode" auf jeden Fall auch begeistert. Ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob es notwendig gewesen wäre, das Trio Kirk/Spock/McCoy in einem solch großen Ausmaß zu replizieren, um das Ziel, zu den Wurzeln Star Treks zurückzukehren, zu erreichen, aber bin guter Dinge, dass die Charaktere in der zweiten "Episode" individueller dargestellt werden. Insbesondere der Schiffsdoktor erscheint mir etwas zu schamlos an die Vorlage angelehnt. Ich verstehe, dass das durchaus in deiner Absicht lag, finde aber, dass es an einigen Stellen etwas zu dick aufgetragen wirkt.

                Man merkt der Geschichte sehr gut an, dass sie als "Pilotfilm" fungieren soll. Die Charaktere werden schön eingeführt und man bekommt ein gutes Gefühl dafür, um welche Art von Protagonisten es sich drehen wird. Auch mir gefällt der Kniff, mit Dax einen im Grunde bekannten Charakter in den Vordergrund der Geschichte zu stellen und damit eine natürlich wirkende Verbindung zum "alten" Star Trek herzustellen.

                Etwas kritisch sehe ich persönlich das doch sehr abrupte Ende der Geschichte. Ich denke, du hast dich da etwas zu sehr auf den Pilotfilm-Aspekt der Handlung konzentriert, ohne wirklich darauf zu achten, dass die Geschichte an sich auch mit Handlung gefüllt werden sollten. Ich glaube, es wäre von Vorteil gewesen, den Konflikt um die Anomalie etwas eher in die Geschichte einzubauen, um sich am Ende ausgiebiger damit beschäftigen zu können. Das hätte vielleicht auch die Möglichkeit geboten, den Charakter des Serok etwas spannungsvoller und effektgeladener auf die Enterprise treffen zu lassen.

                Allerdings möchte ich nicht allzu kritisch klingen: Deine Geschichte hat mir sehr gefallen und ich freue mich schon auf die erste reguläre "Episode". Gibt es da vielleicht bereits einen Teaser?

                Ich selbst könnte mir übrigens durchaus vorstellen, auch eine Geschichte für das Projekt zu schreiben. Ich denke, ich warte erstmal die nächsten ein-zwei Geschichten ab, um ein besseres Gefühl für die Charaktere und die Richtung, in die du gehen willst, zu bekommen. Aber so grundsätzlich finde ich die Idee faszinierend, etwas beizutragen. Mal sehen.

                Noch etwas zur Form: Erstmal muss ich das Englisch loben; die Sprache, die Dialoge und Beschreibungen wirken sehr natürlich und in fast allen Fällen nicht "übersetzt". Das ist ein großes Plus, weil man der Geschichte auch leicht hätte anmerken können, dass sie nicht von einem Muttersprachler stammt. Rein förmlich finde ich allerdings den Verzicht auf Leerzeilen zwischen den Absätzen etwas unvorteilhaft. Ich bin mir sicher, dass es das Lesen erleichtern würde, wenn der Text etwas übersichtlicher gestaltet wäre. Ist nicht deine Schuld, aber die langen Zeilen des Forums laden nicht gerade zum Lesen ein. Deshalb sollte man es dem Leser vielleicht etwas "bequemer" machen. (Da spricht der Typograph in mir ...)

                Zitat von Kai "the spy"
                Wenn es möglich wäre, Audio-Kommentare Prosa hinzuzufügen, würde es wohl auch mit jeder Episode was von mir zu hören geben.
                Ob du's glaubst oder nicht, dass haben ich und ein Freund bei einer Geschichte tatsächlich mal getan! Im Grunde haben wir dem Text einfach in anderer Farbe Hintergrundinformationen hinzugefügt. Klappte eigentlich ganz gut.

                Kommentar


                • #9
                  Zitat von Xon Beitrag anzeigen
                  Also mich hast du mit deiner Idee und der ersten "Episode" auf jeden Fall auch begeistert. Ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob es notwendig gewesen wäre, das Trio Kirk/Spock/McCoy in einem solch großen Ausmaß zu replizieren, um das Ziel, zu den Wurzeln Star Treks zurückzukehren, zu erreichen, aber bin guter Dinge, dass die Charaktere in der zweiten "Episode" individueller dargestellt werden. Insbesondere der Schiffsdoktor erscheint mir etwas zu schamlos an die Vorlage angelehnt. Ich verstehe, dass das durchaus in deiner Absicht lag, finde aber, dass es an einigen Stellen etwas zu dick aufgetragen wirkt.
                  Das liegt im Grunde daran, dass es eine Einführung ist. Wir (und Dax) lernen Dr. Peters gerade erst kennen, und entsprechend ist sein Charakter noch nicht im Einklang mit seiner Umgebung, da er und Dax sich nicht kennen und der Leser ihn in relativ kurzer Zeit kennen lernen soll.
                  Zur Episode 1x01 werde ich weiter unten noch einiges erklären.

                  Man merkt der Geschichte sehr gut an, dass sie als "Pilotfilm" fungieren soll. Die Charaktere werden schön eingeführt und man bekommt ein gutes Gefühl dafür, um welche Art von Protagonisten es sich drehen wird. Auch mir gefällt der Kniff, mit Dax einen im Grunde bekannten Charakter in den Vordergrund der Geschichte zu stellen und damit eine natürlich wirkende Verbindung zum "alten" Star Trek herzustellen.

                  Etwas kritisch sehe ich persönlich das doch sehr abrupte Ende der Geschichte. Ich denke, du hast dich da etwas zu sehr auf den Pilotfilm-Aspekt der Handlung konzentriert, ohne wirklich darauf zu achten, dass die Geschichte an sich auch mit Handlung gefüllt werden sollten. Ich glaube, es wäre von Vorteil gewesen, den Konflikt um die Anomalie etwas eher in die Geschichte einzubauen, um sich am Ende ausgiebiger damit beschäftigen zu können. Das hätte vielleicht auch die Möglichkeit geboten, den Charakter des Serok etwas spannungsvoller und effektgeladener auf die Enterprise treffen zu lassen.
                  Ja, es geht tatsächlich relativ schnell am Ende. Das liegt zum Einen daran, dass ich einfach keine Möglichkeit fand, den Handlungsteil um die Anomalie zu strecken, ohne Längen zu riskieren, zum Anderen an meiner Absicht, nicht zu lange Episoden zu schreiben. Ich habe selbst als Leser bei Online-Prosa die Erfahrung gemacht, dass ich einer Geschichte eher eine Chance gebe, wenn sie relativ kurz ist und ich somit kein großes Risiko eingehe, meine Zeit mit etwas zu vergeuden, was vielleicht gar nicht meinem Geschmack entspricht (übrigens lese ich inzwischen auch eher kürzere Romane von 150 - 400 Seiten den in der heutigen SF-Szene so populären Wälzern und eng verbandelten Zyklen vorziehe). Ich verstehe diese Kritik durchaus, den Makel sehe ich selbst.

                  Allerdings möchte ich nicht allzu kritisch klingen: Deine Geschichte hat mir sehr gefallen und ich freue mich schon auf die erste reguläre "Episode". Gibt es da vielleicht bereits einen Teaser?
                  Hm, ... eigentlich ist der Start der regulären ersten Staffel für Juni geplant, und ab dann monatlich eine neue Episode bis zum Staffelfinale. Eine Leseprobe will ich daher lieber noch nicht posten (auch wenn die Episode bereits fertig geschrieben ist und teilweise auch schon Korrektur gelesen wurde). Aber ein paar Punkte kann ich dazu schon mal verraten.

                  Episode 1x01 wird den Titel "A Mind of their own" tragen. Nach klassischer Trek-Manier haben wir es mit einem Planeten mit einem Geheimnis zu tun, welches den Captain vor ein ethisches Dilemma stellt. Dabei wird auch das "Dreiergestirn"-Prinzip erstmals in der Serie voll angewendet, Serok und Peters werden also unterschiedliche Sichtweisen darlegen.
                  Außerdem werden wir in dieser Episode mehr von Lieutenant Commander Benger und Ensign Sina "sehen".
                  Und der Handlungsstrang der ersten Staffel wird angestossen, als sich verschiedene Mächte für das Wurmloch interessieren.

                  Ich selbst könnte mir übrigens durchaus vorstellen, auch eine Geschichte für das Projekt zu schreiben. Ich denke, ich warte erstmal die nächsten ein-zwei Geschichten ab, um ein besseres Gefühl für die Charaktere und die Richtung, in die du gehen willst, zu bekommen. Aber so grundsätzlich finde ich die Idee faszinierend, etwas beizutragen. Mal sehen.
                  Die erste Staffel ist mit sieben Episoden (ein Zweiteiler) schon so ziemlich durchgeplant, von daher dürftest du genug Zeit zur Eingewöhnung haben, zumal ich ja bei Charakteren und Haupthandlungsstrang der Staffel Hilfestellung gebe.

                  Noch etwas zur Form: Erstmal muss ich das Englisch loben; die Sprache, die Dialoge und Beschreibungen wirken sehr natürlich und in fast allen Fällen nicht "übersetzt". Das ist ein großes Plus, weil man der Geschichte auch leicht hätte anmerken können, dass sie nicht von einem Muttersprachler stammt.
                  Auch dieses Kompliment teile ich mit Uwe Heinzmann und gebe es entsprechend an ihn weiter.

                  Rein förmlich finde ich allerdings den Verzicht auf Leerzeilen zwischen den Absätzen etwas unvorteilhaft. Ich bin mir sicher, dass es das Lesen erleichtern würde, wenn der Text etwas übersichtlicher gestaltet wäre. Ist nicht deine Schuld, aber die langen Zeilen des Forums laden nicht gerade zum Lesen ein. Deshalb sollte man es dem Leser vielleicht etwas "bequemer" machen. (Da spricht der Typograph in mir ...)
                  Richtig, das vergesse ich immer wieder. Online-Lesen ist in der Hinsicht doch anders als ein Buch. Auf jeden Fall habe ich diesen Punkt beherzigt und den Eingangspost entsprechend editiert.

                  Ob du's glaubst oder nicht, dass haben ich und ein Freund bei einer Geschichte tatsächlich mal getan! Im Grunde haben wir dem Text einfach in anderer Farbe Hintergrundinformationen hinzugefügt. Klappte eigentlich ganz gut.
                  Uh, interessante Idee. Wenn Interesse besteht, würde ich mich durchaus zu so etwas hinreißen lassen.
                  Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
                  Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

                  Kommentar


                  • #10
                    Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                    Das liegt im Grunde daran, dass es eine Einführung ist. Wir (und Dax) lernen Dr. Peters gerade erst kennen, und entsprechend ist sein Charakter noch nicht im Einklang mit seiner Umgebung, da er und Dax sich nicht kennen und der Leser ihn in relativ kurzer Zeit kennen lernen soll.
                    Verstehe. Im Grunde nutzt du also die "Abkürzung" über die Ähnlichkeit zu McCoy, um den Leser auf kürzestem Wege an den Charakter Peters heranzuführen. Ich denke, das ist dir auf jeden Fall gelungen. Nur würde ich persönlich es begrüßen, wenn sich der Charakter in Folgegeschichten in eine eher individuelle Richtung entwickeln würde.

                    So oder so; ich bin dabei, um zu sehen, wo das alles hinführt.

                    Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                    Ja, es geht tatsächlich relativ schnell am Ende. Das liegt zum Einen daran, dass ich einfach keine Möglichkeit fand, den Handlungsteil um die Anomalie zu strecken, ohne Längen zu riskieren, zum Anderen an meiner Absicht, nicht zu lange Episoden zu schreiben. Ich habe selbst als Leser bei Online-Prosa die Erfahrung gemacht, dass ich einer Geschichte eher eine Chance gebe, wenn sie relativ kurz ist und ich somit kein großes Risiko eingehe, meine Zeit mit etwas zu vergeuden, was vielleicht gar nicht meinem Geschmack entspricht (übrigens lese ich inzwischen auch eher kürzere Romane von 150 - 400 Seiten den in der heutigen SF-Szene so populären Wälzern und eng verbandelten Zyklen vorziehe). Ich verstehe diese Kritik durchaus, den Makel sehe ich selbst.
                    Die Absicht, eher kürzere Geschichten zu schreiben, um eine möglichst große Menge an Lesern zu animieren, finde ich nicht schlecht. Hat zumindest bei mir auf jeden Fall geklappt. Die Geschichte hat eine gute Länge und ich fände es gut, wenn die anderen "Episoden" ähnlich lang werden.

                    Was das Ende betrifft, denke ich, dass es unter Umständen von Vorteil gewesen wäre, aus dem "Pilotfilm" einen Zweiteiler zu machen. Das heißt, ich hätte am Ende an der Stelle aufgehört, als die remanischen Schiffe auftauchen und die Situation zu eskalieren droht. So hättest du dich in einem zweiten Teil etwas ausführlicher damit beschäftigen können, wie die Problematik gelöst wird.

                    So, wie es jetzt ist, wirkt das ganze schon reichlich gehastet am Schluss. In gefühlt ein bis zwei Sätzchen wird der ganze Konflikt aufgelöst, sodass er letzten Endes irgendwie eher unwichtig erscheint.

                    Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                    Episode 1x01 wird den Titel "A Mind of their own" tragen. Nach klassischer Trek-Manier haben wir es mit einem Planeten mit einem Geheimnis zu tun, welches den Captain vor ein ethisches Dilemma stellt. Dabei wird auch das "Dreiergestirn"-Prinzip erstmals in der Serie voll angewendet, Serok und Peters werden also unterschiedliche Sichtweisen darlegen.
                    Außerdem werden wir in dieser Episode mehr von Lieutenant Commander Benger und Ensign Sina "sehen".
                    Und der Handlungsstrang der ersten Staffel wird angestossen, als sich verschiedene Mächte für das Wurmloch interessieren.
                    Das klingt alles sehr, sehr interessant und ich freue mich darauf, das lesen zu können. Aber: Juni!? Das ist ja noch so lange hin!

                    Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                    Die erste Staffel ist mit sieben Episoden (ein Zweiteiler) schon so ziemlich durchgeplant, von daher dürftest du genug Zeit zur Eingewöhnung haben, zumal ich ja bei Charakteren und Haupthandlungsstrang der Staffel Hilfestellung gebe.
                    Kein Problem. Was eine von mir geschriebene Episode betrifft, bin ich geduldig. Allerdings muss ich schon zugeben, dass mich deine Serienidee beflügelt und ich auch den ganzen Tag über mögliche Ideen für Episoden nachgedacht habe. Ich finde es ist ein Zeichen dafür, dass deine Idee gut ist, dass sie so sehr die Fantasie beflügelt.

                    Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                    Richtig, das vergesse ich immer wieder. Online-Lesen ist in der Hinsicht doch anders als ein Buch. Auf jeden Fall habe ich diesen Punkt beherzigt und den Eingangspost entsprechend editiert.
                    Wow, danke! Damit habe ich jetzt nicht gerechnet. Aber ja, das sieht auf jeden Fall sehr viel besser aus und macht mehr Freude beim Lesen.

                    Mal was ganz anderes: Besteht die Möglichkeit, deine Serie auch auf andere Art zu unterstützen? Ich kann nicht versprechen, dass ich Zeit haben werde, aber ich hätte zum Beispiel durchaus Lust, ein Gruppenbild der Hauptfiguren anzufertigen. Also eine Art Banner oder dergleichen, dass die Charaktere in ihren Uniformen zeigt. Ich stelle mir das als digitale Zeichnung vor, die sich jeweils an den Vorbildern, an die du bei der Konzeption gedacht hast, orientiert. Aber natürlich nur, wenn du für soetwas auch Verwendung hättest.

                    Kommentar


                    • #11
                      Zitat von Xon Beitrag anzeigen
                      Verstehe. Im Grunde nutzt du also die "Abkürzung" über die Ähnlichkeit zu McCoy, um den Leser auf kürzestem Wege an den Charakter Peters heranzuführen. Ich denke, das ist dir auf jeden Fall gelungen. Nur würde ich persönlich es begrüßen, wenn sich der Charakter in Folgegeschichten in eine eher individuelle Richtung entwickeln würde.

                      So oder so; ich bin dabei, um zu sehen, wo das alles hinführt.
                      Naja, ich werde jetzt nicht aus mir herausgehen und eine Szene schreiben, nur um zu verdeutlichen, dass Peters nicht McCoy ist. Ich denke, das wird schon etwas subtiler ablaufen.
                      Peters ist jedenfalls nicht geschieden, und er wird nicht auf einem öden Planeten einem Alien begegnen, das aussieht, wie eine seiner Jugendlieben.

                      Die Absicht, eher kürzere Geschichten zu schreiben, um eine möglichst große Menge an Lesern zu animieren, finde ich nicht schlecht. Hat zumindest bei mir auf jeden Fall geklappt. Die Geschichte hat eine gute Länge und ich fände es gut, wenn die anderen "Episoden" ähnlich lang werden.
                      Die weiteren Episoden werden tatsächlich diese Länge mehr oder weniger beibehalten (knapp zehn A4-Seiten).

                      Was das Ende betrifft, denke ich, dass es unter Umständen von Vorteil gewesen wäre, aus dem "Pilotfilm" einen Zweiteiler zu machen. Das heißt, ich hätte am Ende an der Stelle aufgehört, als die remanischen Schiffe auftauchen und die Situation zu eskalieren droht. So hättest du dich in einem zweiten Teil etwas ausführlicher damit beschäftigen können, wie die Problematik gelöst wird.

                      So, wie es jetzt ist, wirkt das ganze schon reichlich gehastet am Schluss. In gefühlt ein bis zwei Sätzchen wird der ganze Konflikt aufgelöst, sodass er letzten Endes irgendwie eher unwichtig erscheint.
                      Hätte ich machen können, aber das wäre meiner Intention für die Serie zuwider gelaufen. Ist ja nicht gerade clever, eine Serie mit dem Ziel, wieder mehr neue Welten und weniger Politik und Selbstreferrenz, mit einem Zweiteiler zu starten, der sich um Politik und bereits bekannte Völker dreht. Wahrscheinlich ist das auch ein Grund dafür, dass ich diesen Teil relativ schnell hinter mich gebracht habe.

                      Das klingt alles sehr, sehr interessant und ich freue mich darauf, das lesen zu können. Aber: Juni!? Das ist ja noch so lange hin!
                      Naja, knapp anderthalb Monate. Da ich noch andere Projekte habe, aber eine regelmäßige Veröffentlichung garantieren wollte, erschien mir ein monatlicher Rhythmus als sinnvoll. Der Pilot stellt allerdings auch erstmal einen Test dar, wie das Konzept überhaupt ankommt (bis jetzt sehr positiv). Jetzt werde ich eben noch einiges an Vorarbeit für weitere erste Staffel leisten müssen, um den monatlichen Rhythmus garantieren zu können.

                      Kein Problem. Was eine von mir geschriebene Episode betrifft, bin ich geduldig. Allerdings muss ich schon zugeben, dass mich deine Serienidee beflügelt und ich auch den ganzen Tag über mögliche Ideen für Episoden nachgedacht habe. Ich finde es ist ein Zeichen dafür, dass deine Idee gut ist, dass sie so sehr die Fantasie beflügelt.
                      Na, das ist wirklich schönes Feedback!

                      Wow, danke! Damit habe ich jetzt nicht gerechnet. Aber ja, das sieht auf jeden Fall sehr viel besser aus und macht mehr Freude beim Lesen.
                      Gern geschehen.

                      Mal was ganz anderes: Besteht die Möglichkeit, deine Serie auch auf andere Art zu unterstützen? Ich kann nicht versprechen, dass ich Zeit haben werde, aber ich hätte zum Beispiel durchaus Lust, ein Gruppenbild der Hauptfiguren anzufertigen. Also eine Art Banner oder dergleichen, dass die Charaktere in ihren Uniformen zeigt. Ich stelle mir das als digitale Zeichnung vor, die sich jeweils an den Vorbildern, an die du bei der Konzeption gedacht hast, orientiert. Aber natürlich nur, wenn du für soetwas auch Verwendung hättest.
                      Tatsächlich habe ich schon einige Designs (Uniformen, ENTERPRISE und Brücke) zu Papier gebracht und mit einem Freund, der professioneller Grafiker im Comic-Bereich ist, abgesprochen, dass er diese zu vorzeigbaren Bildern bearbeitet. Allerdings hat er relativ wenig Zeit.

                      Generell fände ich solche Illustrationen also super. Ich würde dir meine Skizzen dann auch mal einscannen (was ich allerdings nicht hier zu Hause kann, daher geht das nicht so schnell) und dir zuschicken, damit du eine bessere Ahnung von meinen Vorstellungen hast.
                      Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
                      Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

                      Kommentar


                      • #12
                        Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                        Hätte ich machen können, aber das wäre meiner Intention für die Serie zuwider gelaufen. Ist ja nicht gerade clever, eine Serie mit dem Ziel, wieder mehr neue Welten und weniger Politik und Selbstreferrenz, mit einem Zweiteiler zu starten, der sich um Politik und bereits bekannte Völker dreht.
                        Wenn du auf solche Elemente verzichten willst, wäre es tatsächlich nicht sehr schlau gewesen, sie so ausgiebig zu behandeln. Aber darum geht es mir gar nicht. Es ist auch nicht so, dass ich den Teil um die Anomalie und den Konflikt mit den Remanern als das Herzstück der Geschichte empfunden habe, nein. Worum es mir eigentlich nur geht, ist, dass das eine Storyline war, die viel zu abrupt endete. Mir geht's da auch nicht zwingend um die Politik und Selbstreferenz des Konflikts, sondern um die dramatische Wirkung des Konflikts selbst; also vollkommen losgelöst von den näheren Umständen des Konflikts.

                        Ich weiß nicht, ob ich mich verständlich machen kann. Was ich sagen möchte, ist eigentlich nur: Wenn du einen Konflikt in die Geschichte einfügst (ob nun politischer und selbstreferenzieller Natur oder nicht), sollte dieser auch befriedigend zu Ende gebracht werden.

                        Wenn ich dich richtig verstehe, hätten deine Optionen also eher wie folgt aussehen müssen: (A) Du verzichtest auf den Konflikt am Ende und schickst das Schiff und seine Crew einfach so auf ihre Mission oder du (B) baust den Konflikt ein, aber dann mit allem was dazu gehört und mit der nötigen Dramatik, die derselbe verlangt hätte.

                        Oh Mann, ich hoffe, ich klinge nicht allzu kritisch. Ich glaube, ich habe nur so viel darüber nachgedacht, weil mir die Geschichte so sehr gefällt. Also nimm's mir nicht übel.

                        Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                        Tatsächlich habe ich schon einige Designs (Uniformen, ENTERPRISE und Brücke) zu Papier gebracht und mit einem Freund, der professioneller Grafiker im Comic-Bereich ist, abgesprochen, dass er diese zu vorzeigbaren Bildern bearbeitet. Allerdings hat er relativ wenig Zeit.

                        Generell fände ich solche Illustrationen also super. Ich würde dir meine Skizzen dann auch mal einscannen (was ich allerdings nicht hier zu Hause kann, daher geht das nicht so schnell) und dir zuschicken, damit du eine bessere Ahnung von meinen Vorstellungen hast.
                        Hm, klingt sehr interessant. Ich will deinem Freund natürlich nicht die Arbeit abnehmen, aber wenn du nichts dagegen hast, würde ich mich auch gern an den Charakteren versuchen. Letzten Endes entscheidest eh du, ob du das, was dabei herauskommst, verwenden möchtest oder nicht.

                        Insofern würde ich mich sehr freuen, wenn du mir deine Ideen zuschickst.

                        Kommentar


                        • #13
                          Zitat von Xon Beitrag anzeigen
                          Wenn du auf solche Elemente verzichten willst, wäre es tatsächlich nicht sehr schlau gewesen, sie so ausgiebig zu behandeln. Aber darum geht es mir gar nicht. Es ist auch nicht so, dass ich den Teil um die Anomalie und den Konflikt mit den Remanern als das Herzstück der Geschichte empfunden habe, nein. Worum es mir eigentlich nur geht, ist, dass das eine Storyline war, die viel zu abrupt endete. Mir geht's da auch nicht zwingend um die Politik und Selbstreferenz des Konflikts, sondern um die dramatische Wirkung des Konflikts selbst; also vollkommen losgelöst von den näheren Umständen des Konflikts.

                          Ich weiß nicht, ob ich mich verständlich machen kann. Was ich sagen möchte, ist eigentlich nur: Wenn du einen Konflikt in die Geschichte einfügst (ob nun politischer und selbstreferenzieller Natur oder nicht), sollte dieser auch befriedigend zu Ende gebracht werden.

                          Wenn ich dich richtig verstehe, hätten deine Optionen also eher wie folgt aussehen müssen: (A) Du verzichtest auf den Konflikt am Ende und schickst das Schiff und seine Crew einfach so auf ihre Mission oder du (B) baust den Konflikt ein, aber dann mit allem was dazu gehört und mit der nötigen Dramatik, die derselbe verlangt hätte.

                          Oh Mann, ich hoffe, ich klinge nicht allzu kritisch. Ich glaube, ich habe nur so viel darüber nachgedacht, weil mir die Geschichte so sehr gefällt. Also nimm's mir nicht übel.
                          Naja, sagen wir einfach, da ist natürlich noch Konfliktpotential, und darauf wird in der ersten Staffel auch eingegangen. (I know, I'm a tease )

                          Hm, klingt sehr interessant. Ich will deinem Freund natürlich nicht die Arbeit abnehmen, aber wenn du nichts dagegen hast, würde ich mich auch gern an den Charakteren versuchen. Letzten Endes entscheidest eh du, ob du das, was dabei herauskommst, verwenden möchtest oder nicht.

                          Insofern würde ich mich sehr freuen, wenn du mir deine Ideen zuschickst.
                          Was heißt "Arbeit abnehmen". Er wäre sicherlich ganz froh drum, wenn er da nicht unter Druck gerät, unbedingt bald was liefern zu müssen, da er mit seiner Arbeit als Kolorist diverser US-Comics und durch sein eigenes Comicprojekt (bei dem ich ihm übrigens als Creative Consultant Hilfe leiste) schon ziemlich beschäftigt ist.

                          Ich werde mal schauen, dass ich die Skizzen (und Infos zu "schauspielerischen Vorbildern", soweit vorhanden) in der kommenden Woche mal einscanne und sie dir dann per PN zuschicke.
                          Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
                          Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

                          Kommentar


                          • #14
                            Zitat von Kai "the spy" Beitrag anzeigen
                            Ich werde mal schauen, dass ich die Skizzen (und Infos zu "schauspielerischen Vorbildern", soweit vorhanden) in der kommenden Woche mal einscanne und sie dir dann per PN zuschicke.
                            Ich würde mich jedenfalls sehr freuen.

                            Kommentar


                            • #15
                              STAR TREK BEYOND, 1x01

                              Teaser

                              Captain's Log, Stardate: 228781.18. We are headed to Kolan III.
                              The planet had been visited by Starfleet almost 200 years ago, but
                              otherwise, this world has been untouched by space-faring people.
                              The logs of the U.S.S. DYSON tell of no intelligent life-form,
                              but humanoid primates are populating all parts of the planet.
                              There was little else the DYSON could find out about the place back then,
                              and we intend to take a closer look.

                              From the moment Ensign Sina entered the engine room she was not able to take her eyes off the warp-core. The cylinder-shaped pillar in the middle of the room penetrated several decks of the secondary hull of the ENTERPRISE, and the energy pulsing through it was giving off blue light as it went. It was beautiful.

                              When she finally shook off the hypnotic effect it had on her, she looked around in the large, circular room. “Excuse me,” she approached a Cardassian crewman. “I am looking for Commander Benger. Could you help me out?”

                              The Cardassian nodded, and wordlessly pointed at a humanoid figure among several at the opposite end of the room.

                              “Thank you,” she smiled and headed towards the group of people wearing red uniform jackets. The nearer she came, the better she could make out the voices.

                              “Stabilize the Lexorian plating with the matter-antimatter torch!”

                              “Aye, sir!”

                              “The multi-isolinear conditioner is behaving abnormally. Briggs, look that up!”

                              “Aye, sir!”

                              “Okay, folks, that's it for now, let's get moving!”

                              The group scattered, leaving the young human who had given out the commands facing away from Sina, taking a deep breath.

                              “Commander Benger?” Sina said.

                              The man turned around and looked at her. “Yes?”

                              “I'm Ensign Sina,” she introduced herself. “You agreed to have me working in engineering this week.”

                              “I did? I mean, I did. Yes, right. Uh, so, do you have any experience?”

                              “Well, I've taken engineering courses at the academy, but I hadn't yet a chance to actually work in the area.”

                              “Right,” Benger said, staring absent-minded at her. When he caught himself doing that, he looked down and babbled: “So, maybe you should, uh, stick with me for the first day, watch me and … you know, I tell you what I'm doing.”

                              “Aye, sir,” she said.

                              “Oh, and you can stop doing that,” Benger laughed nervously. “In engineering we keep things, you know, casual. Just call me Achim.”

                              Sina raised her eye-brows. “But I thought I heard those people just now referring to you as 'sir'.”

                              “Oh, that,” Benger said, trying and failing to hide that he had been caught lying. “Well, … uh, they're all … new around here.”

                              Sina couldn't help but smile. The man sure was cute, trying to hide his affection.

                              “Okay, listen, to be honest, I'm not good at this, and, yes, I made this casual thing up. So, if you're more comfortable keeping things formal, we can do that, but ...”

                              “It's alright,” Sina said. “Achim it is.”

                              Benger seemed to glow at her answer. She certainly made his day.

                              Suddenly, he was distracted by a beeping sound on the terminal behind him. “The tetryon subspace sensor is collapsing,” he said. “Kacke, verdammte! I tell you, Sina, sometimes these damned things seem to have a mind of their own.”

                              ****

                              Dax looked at the green and blue planet showing on the main view-screen. “Nice place,” he said. “Serok, what are the sensors telling?”

                              “The planet is largely as described in the DYSON's logs,” the Vulcan said without taking his eyes from his displays and screens. “Class M, breathable atmosphere, gravity at 0.8 G.” He paused, looking puzzled at the readings on his display. “But I am detecting several energy hot spots around the planet, surrounded by large quantities of bio-signals.”

                              “You mean, like power-plants near cities?”

                              “Very similar,” Serok said, “but it contradicts what we know about Kolan III.”

                              “Captain,” Tahor called. “We're being hailed.”

                              Dax looked from Serok to Tahor to the view-screen. “Hailed by whom?”


                              Space. The Final Frontier.
                              These are the Voyages of a new Starship ENTERPRISE.
                              It's renewed Mission: To explore strange new Worlds,
                              to seek out new Life
                              and new Civilizations,
                              to boldly go where no one has gone before,
                              and beyond.


                              STAR TREK BEYOND
                              S1E01
                              “A Mind of Their Own.”
                              written by Kai Brauns
                              Consultant: Uwe Heinzmann

                              Act I

                              Everybody on the bridge stared at the main view-screen, that now showing the low-definition image of a humanoid alien. It was rather furry, with large eyes looking back at them. “Welcome to Kolan III, strange visitors. My name is Orak, and I am the leader of the Kolanian people.”

                              Dax was still stunned, but gathered himself quickly. “I am Captain Jelon Dax of the Federation Starship ENTERPRISE. You must excuse our surprise, we didn't expect to find a civilization on this planet.”

                              Orak seemed to smile with his thin wide lips. “It is excused, as I am sure there will be misunderstandings on our side as well. I would like to welcome you on our planet itself, Captain Dax.”

                              The Trill glanced at his first officer. He could almost hear the upcoming discussion in his head. Nonetheless, he acted on his instinct. “We would be honored to visit your world, Orak,” Dax said. “Please, send us the coordinates for our landing. If you have no objections, we will arrive in three hours.”

                              Orak nodded. “That will be quite alright, Captain. I am looking forward to meeting you in person.”
                              After the image disappeared from the view-screen, Dax glanced over his shoulder to Lieutenant Tahor, who nodded. They were receiving the coordinates.

                              “Captain,” Serok said. “May I have a talk with you?”

                              Great, thought Dax, here it comes! “Sure,” he said and turned to enter his ready room. When the door slid shut behind him and the Vulcan, he turned to face the inevitable argument.

                              “Captain, you know, of course, that contact with the Kolanians is a violation of the Prime Directive.”

                              “Yeah, well, they contacted us,” countered Dax. “As a matter of fact, they knew of us before we knew of them.”

                              “This is a highly delicate situation, sir,” Serok said. “It might be for the best to leave this planet behind now and have Starfleet send a team of experts to study the Kolanians in secret.”

                              “They already know of us, Serok,” Dax argued. “And there is no way of telling how future relations with these people may be hurt by us breaking our promise to visit. We wouldn't want to alienate a potential ally, would we?”

                              “Captain,” Serok said. “May I remind you that this civilization is completely foreign to us. We don't know anything about their customs and their possible agendas, not to mention the fact that this civilization wasn't even existent two centuries ago.”

                              “They sure are a mystery,” Dax said, smiling. “Come on, Serok, this kind of stuff is what we are here for. A strange new world, a new civilization, a planet and its mystery. That's what our mission is all about.”

                              “It is also a first contact situation, which is always difficult.”

                              “Listen,” said Dax. “One of my former hosts was Curzon Dax, one of the finest diplomats of the Federation. Two other former hosts were Starfleet officers, one of them a Science Officer. Believe me, I know how to handle a first contact.”

                              “So, you will go down to the planet?”

                              “What, am I talking to a wall or something?” Dax smirked. “Yes, Commander, I will go down to the planet. And you will accompany me.”

                              ****

                              “Remind me again,” Dr. Peters requested as he and the captain walked down the corridor, “why am I accompanying you down to an unknown planet with a civilization we know nothing about?”

                              “Because we are going down to an unknown planet with a civilization we know nothing about,” Dax answered. “There could be unknown bacteria or something like that down there, and it would be good to have you with us, should something happen to one of us.”

                              “And if that one of us would be me, then what?”

                              Dax hesitated. “Then we're screwed? I don't know, Serok will be with us, so he could help you out.”

                              “Oh, great,” Peters said sarcastically. “And this after our little talk about Vulcan medical officers.”

                              “Will you shut up? There's gotta be plenty of Vulcan physicians. Otherwise, Vulcans would have been extinct long ago.”

                              “Well, at least you understand the importance of good doctors.” Peters realized something. “Wait a minute, we're walking towards the shuttle bay.”

                              Dax looked puzzled at his friend. “Uh, yeah. Where else would we go?”

                              “I don't know, I just thought we would beam down there.”

                              “Can't have the Kolanians know that we have this kind of technology. You know the Prime Directive, we are not to interfere with the natural development of this civilization.”

                              “Not more than necessary, you mean,” Peters said. “Or else, we wouldn't even go down there.”

                              “Stop it,” Dax warned him. “I already had this discussion once, I don't want to repeat myself.”

                              They arrived at the shuttle bay, where Serok and Tahor were preparing one of the shuttles for launch.

                              “Oh, great, the Vulcan is here,” Peters said. “He's weird, you know.”

                              “How is he weird?”

                              “You know, he's all logic and stuff.”

                              “You're right,” Dax smirked. “Logic is so weird.”

                              “Is it your intention to annoy me? Because it's working.”

                              “Captain,” Serok greeted Dax when they approached. “We are ready to launch, and we are expected in twenty minutes down on Kolan III.”

                              “Kolan III?” Peters repeated in feigned surprise. “And I thought we'd go visit the Museum of post-modern Arts.”

                              “What are you doing?” Dax asked the doctor.

                              “If you're annoying me, I go ahead and annoy the Vulcan.”

                              “Yeah, well, annoying is about all you are.”

                              “Oh, really,” Peters replied. “Cause if you want, I could stay here.”

                              “You wish.”

                              “If you are ready,” Serok cut in, “we should get on our way, Captain.”

                              “Alright,” Dax said, pushing Peters to the entrance of the shuttle.

                              Serok and Dax sat in the first row of the cockpit, with Tahor and Peters sitting behind them. The Vulcan took the helm. “Weather is clear, we should arrive in approximately eighteen minutes.”

                              “Are you going to do a countdown till we're landing?” Peters asked sarcastically.

                              “I could do a countdown, Doctor,” Serok answered seriously. “Though I could not guarantee for us to land exactly on Zero.”

                              “Leave it, Doc,” Dax said before Peters could further pick on the first officer.

                              Without further comment, the shuttle launched into space and dived this strange new world.


                              Act II

                              “I don't get it,” complained Benger. “There's nothing wrong with the hardware. The tetryon subspace sensor must be affected by something else.”

                              Sina observed his actions closely. “Maybe there's a virus?”

                              “Running the search program,” the engineer said, looking down at the display. “It's a negative. Scheibenkleister, there must be some outside problem interfering with the sensor's functions.”

                              “Like radiation?”

                              “Like radiation,” Benger confirmed. Just then, he realized what they were talking about. “Like radiation,” he repeated. “Benger to bridge,” he called for the ship's intercom. “Could you do a scan for radiation? Something on a tetryon subspace level?”

                              “This is the bridge,” answered the voice of Commander Sagu. “We're trying, but without the sensor actually calibrated for that, I can't promise anything.”

                              “Thank you,” Benger said. “Engineering out.” He smiled at Sina. “Good thinking, Ensign.”

                              ****

                              Dax stepped out of the shuttle and onto the ground. He couldn't help but think that no Starfleet officer had set foot on this planet for two centuries. But right now, he had to focus on the Kolanians surrounding him with astonished looks in their eyes. At least, they seemed astonished. Dax couldn't really tell, since he did not know anything about these people.

                              “Welcome Captain,” a familiar looking Kolanian in a fine robe called. “I hope your descent was without trouble.”

                              “It was fine,” Dax answered with an honest smile. “Thank you. And these,” he turned and nodded towards the other members of the away team, “are my crew, Commander Serok, Dr. Peters and Lieutenant Tahor.”

                              “You are also welcome to us,” said the Kolanian, who Dax figured was Orak. “Please, accompany us to our festivities.” He motioned the Starfleet officers towards the steps to the large building behind him. They all entered, finding themselves in a spacious hall decorated with flowers and a long table. When they had had taken seat on the chairs at the table, food and drink was offered, and a group of Kolanians started a strange dance. Dax noticed Tahor closely observing the scene, while Peters was obviously overrun by all the impressions.

                              “How do you like the fruits, Captain?” Orak asked after Dax had tasted a round something looking like a yellow apple.

                              “This one's very good,” Dax said. “Thank you.”

                              “They are called 'Alairs',” the furry humanoid explained. “They originate from Balsor, the south-western continent. If you wish, we could offer you a box of them when you are going to leave us.”

                              “That is quite generous of you, Leader,” Dax said. “Especially since I can't give you anything in return.”

                              “Oh, that's alright,” Orak said. “They will be a gift. But,” he said thoughtfully, “why exactly is it you cannot give us anything? I mean, as a space-faring people, it can't possibly be for material reasons.”

                              “Your logic is correct,” Serok said. “The reason is of ethical matter. Our highest rule forbids us to interfere with the natural development of other civilizations less advanced than our own.”

                              “That's right,” Dax confirmed. “He didn't even want to come. I had to almost drag him down here.”
                              Orak did not laugh, but looked rather puzzled. “I don't understand.”

                              “It was a joke. I exaggerated for humorous reasons.”

                              “No, I understand that,” Orak said. “But this rule of yours … Is it a young rule?”

                              “The Prime Directive is more than 280 years old,” Serok said.

                              “But, Lancaster didn't follow this rule,” Orak said.

                              Dax glanced at his first officer and back at the Kolanian. “Lancaster?”

                              “Yes,” Orak replied. “He came to us, helped us shape our society, taught us science and language. He was one like you.”

                              “The name does suggest an Earth origin,” Serok stated.

                              “Wait,” Peters, who had overheard the conversation up till now, cut in. “He taught you language? Does that mean you are speaking English?”

                              “Yes,” Orak answered. “Don't we all?”

                              “All but Tahor, Serok and me, it seems,” Dax said. “We're using a translating device we always carry with us. Tell us more about this Lancaster.”

                              Orak gathered his thoughts. “Well, he came to us about one and a half centuries ago. We had just done what he called an evolutionary leap, we had just mastered conscious thought. Before that, we were merely animals.”

                              “And this Lancaster came and taught you communicating and how to build your civilization,” Dax gathered.

                              “But that is impossible,” Serok protested. “Evolution is a slow process. An evolutionary leap as you describe it is an unprecedented event in the known history of our galaxy.”

                              “What happened to Lancaster?” asked Dax.

                              “He stayed with us,” Orak began, “for about twenty years. When he grew old, he went into the forbidden zone.”

                              Dax raised his eyebrows. “You have a forbidden zone?”

                              “Yes,” answered Orak. “It is in the forest of Woldey on the mid-northern continent.”
                              The captain glanced at Serok. They knew what to do now.

                              ****

                              The bridge was dark, as main power was needed for the cloaking device. They just sat there and waited.

                              “naDev qaS wanl' ramqu,” one of them complained another.

                              “bljatlh 'e' ylmev,” the one in the commanding chair shot back.

                              After that, there was silence again, and they continued to wait.

                              ****

                              After the ceremony, the Starfleet officers returned to their shuttle. “We will stay in orbit for the time being,” Dax said to Orak. “We will visit you again tomorrow.”

                              “And you will be as welcome then as you were today,” Orak said, forming a smile with his thin lips.
                              When Dax sat down in the cockpit, he looked at Serok. “Okay, let's find this forbidden zone.”

                              “Do I have to come?” asked Peters.

                              “It'll be night soon,” replied Dax. “I want to get there as soon as possible, so we'll fly there directly.”

                              “What do you expect to find in this forbidden zone, anyway,” the doctor inquired.

                              Dax turned his seat to meet Peters's eye. “Are you kidding? It's a forbidden zone on a planet with a great mystery. It's so cliché, they could have as well put out a sign reading 'This way to the answer of the great mystery'.”

                              “It does resemble similar cases on planets like Gamma Trianguli VI and New Yadera,” Serok noted.
                              “Still, if it's a forbidden zone, it probably is against the local law to enter it,” Peters countered. “Won't we risk our new friendship with the Kolanians by going there?”

                              “We have to find out more about this Lancaster,” Dax said. “He was a citizen of the Federation and therefore bound by the Prime Directive. He has violated it, so we have to learn more about it.”

                              “And what then?”

                              It was Serok who answered: “Standard procedures, Doctor, would be to remedy the damage as best as possible.”

                              “I'm not sure 'damage' is the right word,” Peters commented. “And how do you reverse changes of such massive proportions, anyway?”

                              Neither Dax nor Serok could answer this question.


                              Act III

                              Lieutenant Commander Sagu stood at the science station and looked at the sensor readings on the display. “Sagu to Benger,” she called. “You were right, there is some odd radiation on the tetryon subspace level. Nothing seriously damaging, just interfering with tetryons.”

                              “Good to hear,” came Benger's answer. “Know anything about this radiation?”

                              “Well,” Sagu said, “apparently it originates the planet. The whole planet is radiated. As to the nature of it all, I'll get back to you. Sagu out.”

                              Back in the engine room, Benger looked at Sina. “Looks like you had the right idea. God knows how much time I would have wasted if it weren't for you.”

                              “Oh, I'm sure you would have thought of it yourself pretty quickly,” the ensign replied, turning back to the console, pretending to study the display.

                              “Yeah, well, thanks, anyway.” Benger looked at the chronometer. “Almost lunch time.” He looked back at the attractive young Deltan. Gathering all the courage he had, he asked: “Listen, would you like to join me? For lunch, I mean.”

                              Sina bit her lower lip. She knew where this was going to lead, and she could not allow it. She wasn't allowed to. “I don't think this is a good idea,” she said, almost whispering.

                              Benger tried to cover it, but he was obviously crushed. “Well,” he said, pausing awkwardly afterwards. “I guess, I'll … see you later.”

                              When Sina felt him rush to the exit, she tried to keep her emotions in order. But finally, before the chief engineer had reached the corridor, she turned and called: “Achim!”

                              He stopped and turned to look at her.

                              She noticed the people around looking, so she stepped up to him. “Listen, I really can't. I'd like to, but I just can't.”

                              “All I asked was if you'd like to have lunch with me,” the man said.

                              “No,” Sina disagreed. “It was not all you asked.”

                              There was a silence following. Finally, Sina walked past Achim, just in time before breaking into tears.

                              ****

                              The shuttle had just arrived at the Woldey forest, when Sagu contacted them. “Sir, we have detected unknown radiation all over the planet interfering with our tetryon subspace sensor.”

                              Dax sighed. “What about it?”

                              “It does not seem dangerous, but it originates from the forest you are headed to.”

                              Serok raised an eyebrow. “I'd like the data on this radiation sent to us,” he said.

                              “Aye, sir,” Sagu replied. “ENTERPRISE out.”

                              Serok looked at the captain. “Intriguing,” he said, expressing his curiosity. “A mysterious radiation originating from the forbidden zone.”

                              “There must be a connection,” Dax mused.

                              “Not necessarily,” Serok stated. “It could be a coincidence.”

                              “He didn't mean it figuratively,” replied Peters. “But, seriously, I'm not a fan of the idea of going there, but even I am intrigued.”

                              They landed in a clearing, and Serok used his tricorder to scan for the radiation. He led the way until they found the overgrown wreck of an old Earth spaceship.

                              “I'll be damned,” Peters said.

                              “It is a private one-man cruiser,” noted Serok. “Approximately 230 years old.”

                              “I remember those,” Dax said. “A friend of mine had one back then.”

                              “That's the worm inside you speaking,” Peters commented.

                              “Let me go first,” Tahor said, pulling his phaser and walking towards the thick entrance door. After several minutes Tahor used to work on the mechanism, the door finally opened.

                              The inside of the ship smelled old, foul, dusty. They brandished their flashlights and went into the dark. At the center of the ship, they found a large, pulsing device.

                              “Sir, this is the origin of the radiation,” S'rok stated, reading his tricorder.

                              “But what is its purpose?” Dax wanted to know.

                              “Look,” Peters called and flashed his light into the next room. It was the living quarters, and on the bed lied a mummified human corpse. “I guess, that's Lancaster.”

                              “Get a DNA sample, so we can check his ID back on the ENTERPRISE,” Dax ordered.

                              “To get back to your question,” Serok cut in, “the device's only function seems to be the emanation of the radiation.”

                              “So the real question is, what's the purpose of the radiation,” Dax said.

                              “Exactly,” Serok confirmed. “There are multiple possibilities, but for the moment, it would be pure speculation. If we could redirect power from my tricorder to the ship's computer, maybe we could learn more about the device.”

                              “Alright,” Dax consented. “Go ahead.”

                              Serok wired the tricorder to a nearby computer station. The lights on the station went on and he addressed the the board computer: “Computer, identify the device in the center of the room.”
                              The computer's voice began to speak: “This device is a Lancaster radiation transmitter.”

                              “Request information on Lancaster radiation,” Serok continued.

                              “Lancaster radiation was discovered by Dr. Jonathan R. Lancaster on Stardate 83856.3 during his exploration of the tetryon subspace. On Stardate 84241.7, Dr. Lancaster's ship crash-landed on the planet on Kolan III, where Dr. Lancaster discovered that the Lancaster radiation had a stimulating effect on the brain activity of the dominant primate species, transforming them into an intelligent life-form.”

                              “Stop,” Dax said. He had to process this. “This evolutionary leap Orak told us about ...”

                              “Yes, Captain,” Serok confirmed. “It seems that it was artificially created.”


                              Act IV

                              “Radiation creating intelligence in a primal species,” Peters repeated to himself. “How is that possible?”

                              “Well, Doctor,” Serok began, but before he could continue, Peters cut in: “It was a rhetorical question, Serok. I don't really want you to bore me with the details.” He glanced at the captain. “So, Jelon, what are we going to do?”

                              “Obviously, we have to shut the device off,” Serok stated.

                              “I was asking the captain,” Peters protested. “Besides, what would that help?”

                              “It would return the Kolanians to their natural state.”

                              “You mean, we would retard their intelligence,” Peters said. “You can't be serious.”

                              “Vulcans are not known for humor, Doctor,” Serok replied. “The Prime Directive has been violated by Dr. Lancaster, and we can undo the damage by simply turning off his radiation transmitter.”

                              “Prime Directive, my ass,” Peters said, raising his voice. “We are talking about an entire civilization. Goddammit, we'd practically commit genocide.”

                              “As there will be no lives lost, Doctor, it will hardly be genocide.”

                              “Jelon, you talk some sense into this damned emotionless bonehead,” Peters demanded.

                              Dax sighed. “You're right, Serok.”

                              Peters stared in shock at the captain. “You gotta be kidding.”

                              “Let me finish, Doc,” Dax said. “Serok is right about the Prime Directive. But it's not that easy. The Prime Directive is supposed to protect other civilizations, not destroy them.”

                              “I agree, Captain,” Serok replied. “Nonetheless, the intelligence of the Kolanians goes against their natural state. They could develop intelligence in the future, and they could create their civilization and culture on their own without the interference of a human teacher. If we don't shut the transmitter off, we will deprive them of that opportunity.”

                              “You are such a hypocrite,” Peters accused the commander. “The Vulcan society was largely influenced by one individual, Surak. He taught the Vulcans, who until then were a wild and aggressive people, the ways of logic and peace. Tell me, Serok, what if Surak would not have been a Vulcan himself? Would you reverse the whole development of Vulcan civilization since then? Would you go back to being a wild and aggressive race on the brink of destroying itself?”

                              “You're hypothesis is irrelevant, Doctor, since Surak was a Vulcan. To consider the options had he been not is of purely speculative nature.”

                              There was thoughtful silence in the room. “I need time to think about this,” Dax decided. “Serok, Tahor, you two stay here. And don't shut the device off without my specific order. Doc, you and I return to the ENTERPRISE.”

                              ****

                              Sina sat on her bed, with her arms around her legs and her head on her knees, staring into nothingness. She couldn't do what she wanted to do. She was not allowed. She would be risking her career, her life in Starfleet. But she wanted it. Badly.

                              ****

                              “Talk about brainwashing people,” Peters said before gulping down the last of the Saurian Brandy in his glass.

                              “But what is the brainwashing here?” Dax asked, reclining on the couch of his quarters. “Isn't it really the Lancaster radiation that's altering the Kolanian's natural state of mind?”

                              “Well,” Peters said while pouring some more, “maybe in the strictest sense, yeah. Then again, did it hurt them?”

                              “I don't know,” Dax said. “Damn, how can I ever make such a decision?”
                              Doc emptied his glass again. “Indeed,” he said glancing knowingly at Dax.

                              Act V

                              Captain's log, supplementary. I have decided not to make a decision,
                              but to give the Kolanians themselves the chance to decide over their own fate.
                              For this, I have visited Orak again and told him about the Lancaster radiation transmitter.

                              “I am still shocked, Captain,” the Kolanian said. “To think that our intelligence is the product of artificially created radiation ...”

                              “I know,” Dax said sympathetically. “You have to get your head around this one.”

                              “I beg your pardon?”

                              “Nothing,” the Trill said. “Just an expression. You know what to do, yet?”

                              Orak sat back. “You were right not to make this decision for us. This decision is too big even for myself. We have to ask the people of Kolan III. All of them. We all have to decide together.”

                              “And what will you vote for?” Dax asked.

                              Orak sighed. “If you had the choice of being a mindless animal or a sentient being, what would you decide, Captain?”

                              Dax thought for a moment. “You know, I might envy animals from time to time, not having a care in the world, not having to plan ahead, just living the moment. But, at the end of the day, I aspire to be more than I am now, not less.”

                              Orak nodded. “Thank you, Captain.”

                              ****

                              Starting his day's shift, Benger gave his daily round of orders.

                              “Briggs, calibrate the directional magnaspanner with synaptic chip!”

                              “Aye, sir!”

                              “Arden, there's a flaw in the auxiliary gel packs, get that, will ya?”

                              “Aye, sir!”

                              Finally, he had a moment to catch his breath, until he suddenly heard a familiar voice behind him.

                              “Ensign Sina reporting for duty!”

                              He turned around and looked at the the bald-headed woman's beautiful face . “Sina!”

                              “And,” she continued, less than sure of herself, “maybe we could have lunch together? Just lunch.”

                              Benger sighed. “You're late.”

                              Worry showed in Sina's face. “I am?”

                              Benger smirked. “But better late than never.”

                              The worry disappeared and Sina began to smile back at him.

                              ****

                              “I still disagree with your decision, Captain,” Serok stated.

                              “Duly noted,” Dax replied, sitting down in his command chair. “But artificial or not, the Kolanians do have a mind of their own. What better use for it than to make the most essential decision possible.” He paused. “Commander Sagu, I think we're due in the Nora system. Transwarp factor 1.2!”

                              “Aye, sir,” Sagu confirmed.

                              The ENTERPRISE accelerated and jumped out of the Kolan system.

                              ****

                              The figure sitting at the sensors called out onto the dark bridge: “veSDuj!”

                              “'Iv?” the one in the command chair demanded to know.

                              “Reman,” was the answer.

                              “ylHotlh!”

                              The main view-screen showed the image of a Reman Warbird.

                              “rI'Se'!”

                              The holographic image of a Reman appeared before the view-screen. “Commander Krogh,” the Reman said. “I am Commander Nozan. So, you followed my invitation.”

                              “What do you want?” asked the Klingon commander.

                              “You may have heard about the developing wormhole in the former Romulus system.” Nozan said. “The Praetor has decided to work with the Federation to use it. An unpopular decision, I might add.”

                              “So what?”

                              “So I heard that you are dissatisfied with the state of the Klingon Empire,” Nozan continued. “You want to go back to conquering other worlds. I propose an alliance. We could get rid of our respective leaders, go to war with the Federation and take what they only want to share.”

                              “Why should I work with Reman scum on an act of treason?”

                              “Because, luckily,” Nozan said, “we don't rely on our leaders to think for us.”


                              Don't miss next month's episode: "To Serve And Trust in Space"
                              Waldorf: "Say, this Thread ain't half bad."
                              Stalter: "Nope, it's all bad."

                              Kommentar

                              Lädt...
                              X