Ankündigung

Einklappen
Keine Ankündigung bisher.

poems

Einklappen
X
  • Filter
  • Zeit
  • Anzeigen
Alles löschen
neue Beiträge

  • poems

    Hi,
    unsere liebe Englischlehrerin hat uns ne nette schöne Aufgabe gegeben.

    Wir dürfen uns ein englisches Gedicht aussuchen und dieses dann erörtern bzw analysieren (auf englisch versteht sich ).

    Mein Problem ist, dass ich keine gute englische Gedichte kenne.
    Daher wollte ich mal hier in die Runde fragen, ob mir jemand vielleicht eins empfehlen kann.

    Ihr dürft diese dann gerne hier posten.

    suchende Grüße
    Hugh
    Wir sind allet Borg. Und Du ooch gleich. Dein Widastand kannste vajessen. Weil wa nämlich Deine janzen Eijenschaften in unsre mit rintun werden. So sieht det aus.

    Generation @, die Zukunft gehört uns.

  • #2
    öhm joa, sollten die Gedichte nen bestimmtes Thema haben? Und schön sind die glaube ich alle nicht, solange man sie analysieren muss

    Ansonsten einfach bei google mal poems eingeben oder vielleicht Shakespeare (auch wenn diese meist verdammt schwer sind zu analysieren). Mit hat google bei meinen Englisch-Hausaufgaben jedenfalls immer sehr geholfen
    "Steigen Sie in den Fichtenelch! - Steigen Sie ein!"

    Kommentar


    • #3
      Frag doch unseren neuen User coldfunk aus Manchester, gerade neu bei uns.
      Der kann dir da doch bestimmt helfen, wenn du ihn lieb fragst!
      greetz
      KillerLoop
      I regret tomorrow more than yesterday!

      Kommentar


      • #4
        Also da gibt es ein sehr schönes, von Robert Frost glaube ich, mit dem Titel "The road not taken".
        Leider weiß ich nur noch, dass ich es eben...schön fand.

        Gruß, succo
        Ich blogge über Blogger, die über Blogger bloggen.

        Kommentar


        • #5
          Hmm... könnt ihr auch Gedichte aus bekannten Dramen nehmen?? Ich finde z.B. Shakespeare Dichtkunst in seinen Werken recht gut.

          Da hätten wir dann:

          Macbeth
          She should have died hereafter;
          There would have been a time for such a word
          To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
          Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
          To the last syllable of recorded time,
          And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
          The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
          Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
          That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
          And then is heard no more: it is a tale
          Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
          Signifying nothing.
          The Merchant of Venice
          The quality of mercy is not strained.
          It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven,
          Upon the place beneath.
          It is twice blessed.
          It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
          It is mightiest in the mightiest,
          It becomes the throned monarch better than his crown.
          His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
          An attribute to awe and majesty.
          Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings.
          But mercy is above this sceptred sway,
          It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
          It is an attribute to God himself.
          And earthly power dost the become likest God's,
          Where mercy seasons justice.
          Therefore Jew,
          Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
          That in the course of justice we all must see salvation,
          We all do pray for mercy
          And that same prayer doth teach us all to render the deeds of mercy.
          I have spoke thus much to mittgate the justice of thy plea,
          Which if thou dost follow,
          This strict court of Venice
          Must needs give sentance gainst the merchant there.
          Romeo and Juliet
          Two households, both alike in dignity,
          In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
          From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
          Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
          From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
          A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
          Whole misadventured piteous overthrows
          Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
          The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
          And the continuance of their parents' rage,
          Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
          Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
          The which if you with patient ears attend,
          What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

          or

          A glooming peace this morning with it brings;
          The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:
          Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;
          Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished:
          For never was a story of more woe
          Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.
          Ich fänd's cool da herumzuanalysieren

          mfg,
          Ce'Rega
          "Archäologie ist nicht das, was sie glauben. Noch nie hat ein X irgendwo, irgendwann einen bedeutenden Punkt markiert."

          „And so the lion fell in love with the lamb“

          Kommentar


          • #6
            nimm doch charge of the light brigade
            edit: von Sternengucker hier gepostet:

            THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE

            by Alfred Lord Tennyson

            HALF a league, half a league,
            Half a league onward,
            All in the valley of Death
            Rode the six hundred.

            'Forward, the Light Brigade!
            Charge for the guns!' he said:
            Into the valley of Death
            Rode the six hundred.

            'Forward, the Light Brigade!'
            Was there a man dismay'd ?
            Not tho' the soldier knew
            Some one had blunder'd:

            Their's not to make reply,
            Their's not to reason why,
            Their's but to do and die:
            Into the valley of Death
            Rode the six hundred.

            Cannon to right of them,
            Cannon to left of them,
            Cannon in front of them
            Volley'd and thunder'd;

            Storm'd at with shot and shell,
            Boldly they rode and well,
            Into the jaws of Death,
            Into the mouth of Hell
            Rode the six hundred.

            Flash'd all their sabres bare,
            Flash'd as they turn'd in air
            Sabring the gunners there,
            Charging an army, while
            All the world wonder'd:

            Plunged in the battery-smoke
            Right thro' the line they broke;
            Cossack and Russian
            Reel'd from the sabre-stroke
            Shatter'd and sunder'd.

            Then they rode back, but not
            Not the six hundred.

            Cannon to right of them,
            Cannon to left of them,
            Cannon behind them
            Volley'd and thunder'd;

            Storm'd at with shot and shell,
            While horse and hero fell,
            They that had fought so well
            Came thro' the jaws of Death,
            Back from the mouth of Hell,
            All that was left of them,
            Left of six hundred.

            When can their glory fade ?
            O the wild charge they made!
            All the world wonder'd.

            Honour the charge they made!
            Honour the Light Brigade,
            Noble six hundred!

            end

            Kommentar


            • #7
              Original geschrieben von succo
              Also da gibt es ein sehr schönes, von Robert Frost glaube ich, mit dem Titel "The road not taken".
              Leider weiß ich nur noch, dass ich es eben...schön fand.

              Gruß, succo
              Da ist es...

              THE ROAD NOT TAKEN

              Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
              And sorry I could not travel both
              And be one traveler, long I stood
              And looked down one as far as I could
              To where it bent in the undergrowth;

              Then took the other, as just as fair,
              And having perhaps the better claim,
              Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
              Though as for that the passing there
              Had worn them really about the same,

              And both that morning equally lay
              In leaves no step had trodden black.
              Oh, I kept the first for another day!
              Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
              I doubted if I should ever come back.

              I shall be telling this with a sigh
              Somewhere ages and ages hence:
              Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
              I took the one less traveled by,
              And that has made all the difference.

              Kommentar


              • #8
                Wenns auch schottisch sein darf, dann kannst du mal auf http://www.robertburns.org/ schauen. Robert Buns war der wohl größte schottische dichter und Liedermacher.

                Auf der Seite sind auch einige zusätzliche Angaben. z.B. Übersetzungen von schottischen wörtern in deutsch, englisch, spanisch und Französisch.

                Ein Beispiel:

                A Red, Red Rose:

                O my Luve's like a red, red rose,
                That's newly sprung in June:
                O my Luve's like the melodie,
                That's sweetly play'd in tune.

                As fair art thou, my bonie lass,
                So deep in luve am I;
                And I will luve thee still, my dear,
                Till a' the seas gang dry.

                Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,
                And the rocks melt wi' the sun;
                And I will luve thee still, my dear,
                While the sands o' life shall run.

                And fare-thee-weel, my only Luve!
                And fare-thee-weel, a while!
                And I will come again, my Luve,
                Tho' 'twere ten thousand mile!
                Eines meiner Lieblingsstücke:
                (Wenn auch wegen der Melodie der Gesungenen Fassung)

                Ye Jacobites by name, give an ear, give an ear,
                Ye Jacobites by name, give an ear,
                Ye Jacobites by name,
                Your fautes I will proclaim,
                Your doctrines I maun blame, you shall hear.

                What is Right, and What is Wrang, by the law, by
                the law?
                What is Right and what is Wrang by the law?
                What is Right, and what is Wrang?
                A short sword, and a lang,
                A weak arm and a strang, for to draw.

                What makes heroic strife, famed afar, famed afar?
                What makes heroic strife famed afar?
                What makes heroic strife?
                To whet th' assassin's knife,
                Or hunt a Parent's life, wi' bluidy war?

                Then let your schemes alone, in the state, in the state,
                Then let your schemes alone in the state.
                Then let your schemes alone,
                Adore the rising sun,
                And leave a man undone, to his fate.
                Es geht darin um die hoch gelobten Jacobiten, welche in dem Text hinterfragt werden.

                Es sind über 550 Stücke zur Auswahl!
                Planung ist die Ersetzung des Zufalls durch den Irrtum!
                Bilder vom 1. und 4.Treffen

                Kommentar


                • #9
                  Danke für die vielen Gedichte.
                  da sind einige schöne drunter

                  Vorgaben gab es eigendlich keine.
                  Es muss nur auf englisch sein, sich reimen und ich sollte ca. 30 Minuten darüber reden können hhmann

                  mfg,
                  Hugh
                  Wir sind allet Borg. Und Du ooch gleich. Dein Widastand kannste vajessen. Weil wa nämlich Deine janzen Eijenschaften in unsre mit rintun werden. So sieht det aus.

                  Generation @, die Zukunft gehört uns.

                  Kommentar


                  • #10
                    nun, was vielleicht ganz interessant ist (30 min. sind schließlich nicht wenig, ist:
                    W.H. Auden - After Reading a Child's Guide to Modern Physics

                    allerdings würde ich vorschlagen, ein Gedicht aus dem Herrn der Ringe zu nehmen, denn die sind alle ausgesprochen schön und man kann stundenlang darüber reden (allein, das gedicht in einen kontext einzubetten, gibt genug stoff für die ganze stunde)


                    laß uns jedenfalls wissen, wie du dich entscheidest!
                    Lambdas changed my life. (Barbara H. Partee)

                    Kommentar


                    • #11
                      Original geschrieben von Venn

                      laß uns jedenfalls wissen, wie du dich entscheidest!
                      Das mache ich auf jeden Fall
                      Und nochmal Danke.

                      Das mit HDR ist keine schlechte Idee und aus den vielen geposteten Gedichten werde ich ein schönes auswählen.

                      Ich habe ja auch noch ne Woche Zeit um mich zu entscheiden.

                      mfg,
                      Hugh
                      Wir sind allet Borg. Und Du ooch gleich. Dein Widastand kannste vajessen. Weil wa nämlich Deine janzen Eijenschaften in unsre mit rintun werden. So sieht det aus.

                      Generation @, die Zukunft gehört uns.

                      Kommentar

                      Lädt...
                      X