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STS-122 Atlantis - ESA Laboratory "Columbus"

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  • STS-122 Atlantis - ESA Laboratory "Columbus"


    STS-122 will be ISS Assembly Flight 1E, bringing the European Columbus
    module to the station, along with other minor pieces of equipment.



    STS-122

    STS-122 (englisch Space Transportation System)
    ist eine Missionsbezeichnung für den US-amerikanischen Space Shuttle
    Atlantis (OV-104) der NASA.

    Der Start ist momentan für den 6. Dezember 2007 vorgesehen.



    STS-122 Overview

    A veteran space flier, Navy Cmdr. Stephen N. Frick, will command the
    STS-122 shuttle mission to deliver the European Space Agency's
    Columbus Laboratory to the International Space Station. Navy Cmdr. Alan
    G. Poindexter will serve as pilot. Mission specialists include Air Force Col.
    Rex J. Walheim, Stanley G. Love, Leland D. Melvin and European Space
    Agency astronaut Hans Schlegel. Poindexter, Love and Melvin will be
    making their first spaceflight.

    Expedition 15 Flight Engineer Daniel Tani, who is set to fly to the space
    station on the STS-120 mission, will return home with the STS-122 crew.

    STS-122 is the 24th shuttle mission to the International Space Station.

    Mission: STS-122 - 24th International Space Station Flight (1E) - Columbus Laboratory
    Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
    Location: Vehicle Assembly Building, High Bay 1 (STS-117)
    Launch Date: Targeted for Dec. 6, 2007
    Launch Pad: 39A
    Crew: Stephen Frick, Alan Poindexter, Rex Walheim, Stanley Love,
    Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel and Léopold Eyharts
    Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

    Shuttle Flight: No. 121
    Atlantis Flight: No. 29
    Shuttle-ISS Flight: No. 24



    Next: The STS-122 Crew



    NASA TV
    STS-122
    Columbus (Raumlabor)
    ESA: Columbus Laboratory
    ESA: Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory
    Zuletzt geändert von STS-Chris; 23.04.2007, 22:21.

  • #2
    STS-122 Atlantis




    Die Crew


    CDR Stephen Frick (2. Flug)
    Bisherige Flüge:
    STS-110 Atlantis, ISS (2002)


    PLT Alan Poindexter (1. Flug)


    MS Stanley Love (1. Flug)


    MS Rex Walheim (2. Flug)
    Bisherige Flüge:
    STS-110 Atlantis, ISS (2002)


    MS Leland Melvin (1. Flug)


    MS Hans Schlegel (2. Flug) ESA, Germany
    Bisherige Flüge:
    STS-55 Columbia, D-2 Mission (1993)


    ISS Léopold Eyharts (2. Flug) ESA, France (Start)
    Bisherige Flüge:
    Soyuz TM-27, MIR (1998)


    ISS Daniel Tani (Landung)
    Bisherige Flüge:
    STS-108 Endeavour, ISS (2001)


    Quelle: NASA.gov



    NASA TV
    STS-122
    Columbus (Raumlabor)
    ESA: Columbus Laboratory
    ESA: Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory

    Kommentar


    • #3
      STS-122 Atlantis



      Next Events

      November 2007
      Rollover of orbiter Atlantis from
      Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 1
      to Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


      November 2007
      Rollout to Launch Pad 39A

      Thu 6 December 2007
      Launch


      All times could change at short notice.
      Changes are indicated in red.






      Space Shuttle Processing
      Status Report S-072707


      Fr 27 July 2007

      Mission: STS-122 - 24th International Space Station Flight (1E) -
      "Columbus" Laboratory
      Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
      Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1
      Launch Date: Targeted for Dec. 6, 2007
      Launch Pad: 39A
      Crew: Stephen Frick, Alan Poindexter, Hans Schlegel,
      Léopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim
      Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

      In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 1, the orbiter boom sensor system
      has been removed, inspected and reinstalled in the orbiter. Windows No.
      1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 have been removed and replaced. The external tank door
      push test, which measures actuator performance, is complete. Technicians
      are performing hypergolic fuel system testing on the orbital maneuvering
      system pods.


      Quelle: NASA.gov



      NASA TV
      STS-122 (Wikipedia)
      Columbus (Raumlabor) (Wikipedia)
      Columbus Laboratory (ESA)
      Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory (ESA)

      Kommentar


      • #4
        STS-122 Atlantis



        Next Events

        November 2007
        Rollover of orbiter Atlantis from
        Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 1
        to Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


        November 2007
        Rollout to Launch Pad 39A

        Thu 6 December 2007
        Launch


        All times could change at short notice.
        Changes are indicated in red.






        Space Shuttle Processing
        Status Report S-083107


        Fr 31 August 2007

        Mission: STS-122 - 24th International Space Station Flight (1E) -
        "Columbus" Laboratory
        Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
        Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1
        Launch Date: Targeted for Dec. 6, 2007
        Launch Pad: 39A
        Crew: Stephen Frick, Alan Poindexter, Hans Schlegel,
        Léopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim
        Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

        In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 1, workers continue making
        modifications to the orbiter's engine cutoff sensor wiring. This work
        involves rerouting new wires and installing new resistors. Inspections of
        the main propulsion system flow liners are complete, and the drag chute
        door has been installed. Orbiter power system validation will begin next
        week after the vehicle is powered up.



        KSC-07PD-1805 (4 July 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
        Atlantis is towed into the Orbiter Processing Facility. The orbiter will
        undergo processing for its next launch, mission STS-122 in December.
        Visible on Atlantis is the tail cone that covers and protects the main
        engines during the ferry flight. Atlantis arrived at Kennedy Space Center
        atop the SCA on July 3 after a three-day, cross-country flight due to fuel
        stops and weather delays. Touchdown was at 8:27 a.m. EDT. Atlantis
        landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California on June 22 to end mission
        STS-117. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton.


        Quelle: NASA.gov



        NASA TV
        STS-122 (NASA)
        STS-122 (Wikipedia)
        Columbus (Raumlabor) (Wikipedia)
        Columbus Laboratory (ESA)
        Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory (ESA)

        Kommentar


        • #5
          STS-122 Atlantis



          Next Events

          ~ Sun 23 September 2007
          Solid Rocket Booster Stacking in the
          Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


          October/November 2007
          Rollover of orbiter Atlantis from
          Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 1
          to Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


          November 2007
          Rollout to Launch Pad 39A

          Thu 6 December 2007
          4:30 p.m. EST (22:30 CET)

          Launch


          All times could change at short notice.
          Changes are indicated in red.




          Space Shuttle Processing
          Status Report S-090707


          Fr 7 September 2007

          Mission: STS-122 - 24th International Space Station Flight (1E) -
          "Columbus" Laboratory
          Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
          Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1
          Launch Date: Targeted for Dec. 6, 2007
          Launch Pad: 39A
          Crew: Stephen Frick, Alan Poindexter, Hans Schlegel,
          Léopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim
          Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

          In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 1, modifications are finished on the
          orbiter's engine cutoff sensor wiring. This involved rerouting new wires
          and installing new resistors. Orbiter power system validation is complete.
          Technicians finished waterproofing the orbiter's thermal protection system
          last weekend. Checkout and verification of the orbiter's remote
          manipulator system, also known as the shuttle arm, is under way.


          Quelle: NASA.gov



          NASA TV
          STS-122 (NASA)
          STS-122 (Wikipedia)
          Columbus (Raumlabor) (Wikipedia)
          Columbus Laboratory (ESA)
          Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory (ESA)

          Kommentar


          • #6
            STS-122 Atlantis



            Next Events

            ~ Sun 23 September 2007
            Solid Rocket Booster Stacking in the
            Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


            October/November 2007
            Rollover of orbiter Atlantis from
            Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 1
            to Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


            November 2007
            Rollout to Launch Pad 39A

            Thu 6 December 2007
            4:30 p.m. EST (22:30 CET)

            Launch


            All times could change at short notice.
            Changes are indicated in red.




            Space Shuttle Processing
            Status Report S-091407


            Fr 14 September 2007

            Mission: STS-122 - 24th International Space Station Flight (1E) -
            "Columbus" Laboratory
            Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
            Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1
            Launch Date: Targeted for Dec. 6, 2007
            Launch Pad: 39A
            Crew: Stephen Frick, Alan Poindexter, Hans Schlegel,
            Léopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim
            Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

            In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, checkout and verification of the
            orbiter's remote manipulator system, also known as the shuttle arm, are
            complete. Technicians are reinstalling the left orbital maneuvering system
            pod, which was removed for a valve repair. System testing continues in
            the vehicle. Technicians are checking out the water spray boiler system.

            ET-125, the external fuel tank for mission STS-122, arrived at Kennedy
            via barge at 12:30 p.m. today. The tank was then offloaded and
            transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building, where it will be lifted into a
            checkout cell on Saturday to allow for processing.


            Quelle: NASA.gov



            Image Gallery

            Fri 14 September 2007


            KSC-07PD-2457 (14 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            Tugboats tow the Pegasus barge toward the dock in the turn basin of the
            Launch Complex 39 Area. At left is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The
            barge is carrying external tank No. 125. After it is offloaded, the tank will
            be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The external tank will be used
            on space shuttle Atlantis for mission STS-122 targeted for launch on Dec. 6.
            Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            KSC-07PD-2458 (14 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            Tugboats maneuver the Pegasus barge toward the dock in the turn basin
            of the Launch Complex 39 Area. The barge is carrying external tank No.
            125. After it is offloaded, the tank will be moved to the Vehicle Assembly
            Building. The external tank will be used on space shuttle Atlantis for
            mission STS-122 targeted for launch on Dec. 6.
            Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            KSC-07PD-2464 (14 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            External tank No. 125 is moved out of the Pegasus barge at the Launch
            Complex 39 Area turn basin. After offloading, the tank will be transported
            to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The tank arrived at Kennedy on the
            Pegasus barge from the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans. The
            external tank will be used on space shuttle Atlantis for mission STS-122
            targeted for launch on Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryde


            KSC-07PD-2466 (14 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            On its transporter, external tank No. 125 moves toward the Vehicle
            Assembly Building in the background. The tank arrived at the Launch
            Complex 39 Area turn basin on the Pegasus barge from the Michoud
            Assembly Facility near New Orleans. The external tank will be used on
            space shuttle Atlantis for mission STS-122 targeted for launch on Dec. 6.
            Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            KSC-07PD-2468 (14 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            On its transporter, external tank No. 125 moves toward the Vehicle
            Assembly Building, at right. The tank arrived at the Launch Complex 39
            Area turn basin on the Pegasus barge from the Michoud Assembly Facility
            near New Orleans. The external tank will be used on space shuttle Atlantis
            for mission STS-122 targeted for launch on Dec. 6.
            Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            KSC-07PD-2470 (14 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            On its transporter, external tank No. 125 moves through the entrance in
            the Vehicle Assembly Building. The tank arrived at the Launch Complex 39
            Area turn basin on the Pegasus barge from the Michoud Assembly Facility
            near New Orleans. The external tank will be used on space shuttle Atlantis
            for mission STS-122 targeted for launch on Dec. 6.
            Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            Sat 15 September 2007


            KSC-07PD-2475 (15 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building, external tank No.
            125 is suspended above the floor as it is being raised to a vertical position.
            It will then be lifted into a checkout cell in high bay 4 to allow for
            processing. The tank will be part of the space shuttle stack for mission
            STS-122 targeted to launch Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            KSC-07PD-2478 (15 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            Seen from below, external tank No. 125 is being lifted high into the upper
            levels of the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer to a checkout cell in
            high bay 4 to allow for processing. The tank will be part of the space
            shuttle stack for mission STS-122 targeted to launch Dec. 6.
            Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            KSC-07PD-2483 (15 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
            After its lift and transfer inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, external
            tank No. 125 is suspended in a checkout cell in high bay 4 for processing.
            The tank will be part of the space shuttle stack for mission STS-122
            targeted to launch Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


            Quelle: NASA/KSC



            NASA TV
            STS-122 (NASA)
            STS-122 (Wikipedia)
            Columbus (Raumlabor) (Wikipedia)
            Columbus Laboratory (ESA)
            Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory (ESA)

            Kommentar


            • #7
              STS-122 Atlantis



              Next Events

              October/November 2007
              Rollover of orbiter Atlantis from
              Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 1
              to Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)


              November 2007
              Rollout to Launch Pad 39A

              Thu 6 December 2007
              4:30 p.m. EST (22:30 CET)

              Launch


              All times could change at short notice.
              Changes are indicated in red.




              Space Shuttle Processing
              Status Report S-100507


              Fr 5 October 2007

              Mission: STS-122 - 24th International Space Station Flight (1E) -
              "Columbus" Laboratory
              Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
              Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1
              Launch Date: Targeted for Dec. 6, 2007
              Launch Pad: 39A
              Crew: Stephen Frick, Alan Poindexter, Hans Schlegel,
              Léopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim
              Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

              In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay No. 1, workers are installing the main
              engine heat shields. Engine integrated testing and mate operations are
              complete. Technicians have also completed checkout of the water spray
              boiler system. Functional checkout of the external tank doors is finished.
              Midbody closeout and inspection work continues, with final payload bay
              door closure scheduled for next week.

              In the Vehicle Assembly Building, processing continues on ET-125, the
              external fuel tank for the STS-122 mission, including repairs to the liquid
              oxygen feedline support bracket foam. In high bay No. 3, stacking of the
              solid rocket boosters is under way. The right forward booster segment will
              be lifted to the stack this weekend.


              Quelle: NASA.gov



              Image Gallery

              Thu 27 September 2007


              KSC-07PD-2600 (27 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              Members of the STS-122 crew look over the Columbus Research
              Laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew is at
              Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps
              familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission. Among the
              activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the
              thermal protection system and camera operation for planned
              extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The crew comprises Commander
              Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim,
              Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the
              European Space Agency. The Columbus Lab is Europe's largest
              contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will
              support scientific and technological research in a microgravity
              environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional,
              pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the
              space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics
              and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological
              applications. STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.
              Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann


              Fri 28 September 2007


              KSC-07PD-2637 (28 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew look over
              cameras that will be used during the mission. From left are Mission
              Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim and Pilot Alan
              Poindexter. The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew
              equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and
              payloads for the mission. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are
              harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera
              operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs.


              KSC-07PD-2640 (28 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice
              handling cameras that will be used during the mission. At left is Mission
              Specialist Hans Schlegel. At right is Pilot Alan Poindexter. Schlegel
              represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at Kennedy Space
              Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps
              familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission.


              KSC-07PD-2644 (28 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 Commander Stephen Frick
              checks out the cockpit on space shuttle Atlantis. He and other crew
              members are at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment
              interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads
              for the mission.


              KSC-07PD-2646 (28 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance technicians
              provide lights over the space shuttle Atlantis' cockpit. STS-122
              Commander Stephen Frick is inside checking the cockpit for launch
              readiness.


              KSC-07PD-2652 (28 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members practice
              working with equipment for the mission. From left are Commander
              Stephen Frick and Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and
              Stanley Love. Schlegel represents the European Space Agency. The crew
              is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface
              test, which includes equipment familiarization.


              KSC-07PD-2653 (28 September 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look
              at some of the equipment for the mission. From left, in the foreground, are
              Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Rex Walheim and Pilot Alan
              Poindexter. In the background at left is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; at
              right is European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who will be on
              the mission and joining the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the
              International Space Station.


              Fri 5 October 2007


              KSC-07PD-2661 (5 October 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a United Space Alliance technician
              prepares the surface of Atlantis for installation of a thermal protection
              system tile. Space shuttle Atlantis is targeted for launch on mission
              STS-122 on Dec. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller


              KSC-07PD-2663 (5 October 2007) [Low Res | High Res]
              In the Vehicle Assembly Building, the solid rocket booster segments are
              being stacked on the mobile launcher platform for mission STS-122. Space
              shuttle Atlantis is targeted for launch on mission STS-122 on Dec. 6.
              Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller


              Quelle: NASA/KSC



              NASA TV
              STS-122 (NASA)
              STS-122 (Wikipedia)
              Columbus (Raumlabor) (Wikipedia)
              Columbus Laboratory (ESA)
              Technical specifications of the Columbus Laboratory (ESA)

              Kommentar


              • #8
                Der Start wurde schon wieder verschoben. Nachdem am Donnerstag schon zwei Tanksensoren ausfielen, war es heute nur einer. Das Protokoll schreibt jedoch vier funktionierende Sensoren vor.

                Ich hoffe wirklich, dass diese Mission noch klappen wird.
                'To infinity and beyond!'

                Kommentar


                • #9
                  Die haben doch noch ein paar Tage Zeit.

                  Also Daumen drücken
                  Klimaerwärmung einmal positiv
                  Der deutsche Rechtsstaat in Aktion.

                  Kommentar


                  • #10
                    Ich hab gehört das der Deutsche Astronaut nicht mitfliegen soll. das war vor einem oder zwei Tagen in den Nachrichten
                    ~~:::Battlestar Galactica:::~~~

                    InterStella - Foren-RPG

                    Kommentar


                    • #11
                      Gestern wurde immer wieder gesagt das er mitfleigt, er ist immerhin für das Modul und die Montage verantwortlich.
                      Klimaerwärmung einmal positiv
                      Der deutsche Rechtsstaat in Aktion.

                      Kommentar


                      • #12
                        dann wár das vorgestern und gestern hat man dann bestätigt, das er doch mitfliegt! Würd ich jetzt sagen
                        ~~:::Battlestar Galactica:::~~~

                        InterStella - Foren-RPG

                        Kommentar


                        • #13
                          Start frühestens am 02. Januar

                          Dec. 9 -11:30 a.m. EST
                          Space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission to the International Space Station now is targeted to launch no earlier than Jan. 2 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The liftoff date depends on the resolution of a problem in a fuel sensor system.

                          Early Sunday, one of the four engine cutoff, or ECO, sensors inside the liquid hydrogen section of Atlantis' external fuel tank gave a false reading while the tank was being filled. NASA's current Launch Commit Criteria require that all four sensors function properly.

                          The sensor system is one of several that protect the shuttle's main engines by triggering their shut down if fuel runs unexpectedly low. Atlantis' scheduled launch on Thursday, Dec. 6, was delayed after two liquid hydrogen ECO sensors gave false readings.

                          The crew of Atlantis said the technical issue did not dampen their gratitude for the effort to launch.

                          "We want to thank everyone who worked so hard to get us into space this launch window," the astronauts said in a statement. "We had support teams working around the clock at KSC, JSC, and numerous sites in Europe. We were ready to fly, but understand that these types of technical challenges are part of the space program. We hope everyone gets some well-deserved rest, and we will be back to try again when the vehicle is ready to fly."

                          The main objective of Atlantis' 11-day mission is to install and activate the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory, which will provide scientists around the world the ability to conduct a variety of life, physical and materials science experiments.
                          Quelle: NASA - Home

                          Nachdem das Problem mit den Tanksensoren nicht komplett behoben werden konnte und ein Start nur mit vier funktionierenden Sensoren erfolgen darf, will man sich nun länger Zeit nehmen um das Problem zu lösen.

                          Als Start ist also das nächste Jahr geplant. Wahrscheinlich auch im Hinblick auf die Tatsache, dass ja anscheinend die Boardcomputer mit Jahreswechseln Probleme bekommen könnten.

                          Ich wünsche den Technikern jedenfalls viel Erfolg bei der Reparatur, so dass nächstes Jahr Columbus gen Himmel segeln kann.
                          'To infinity and beyond!'

                          Kommentar


                          • #14
                            Ich möchte mal ganz provokant und auf Basis politischer Realität sagen:

                            Könnte es trotz der maroden Shuttle-Flotte Absicht sein?
                            Um das wichtigste Projekt der europäischen Raumfahrt zu behindern?
                            Um uns zu zeigen, wie abhängig wir noch immer von den USA sind?
                            Ever danced with the devil in the pale moonlight?
                            -- Thug --

                            Kommentar


                            • #15
                              Zitat von HiroP Beitrag anzeigen
                              Ich möchte mal ganz provokant und auf Basis politischer Realität sagen:

                              Könnte es trotz der maroden Shuttle-Flotte Absicht sein?
                              Um das wichtigste Projekt der europäischen Raumfahrt zu behindern?
                              Um uns zu zeigen, wie abhängig wir noch immer von den USA sind?
                              Und wem sollte das etwas bringen? Es wird ja nun der Zeitplan der NASA durcheinander gewirbelt wird (und die haben ja demnächst eh keine bemannte Kapazität mehr). Außerdem kosten diese Fehlersuchspielchen und Verzögerungen sicher genug Geld.

                              Sensor ist kaputt - Kaputter Sensor kann zur frühzeitigen Triebwerksabschaltung führen - Start ist zu riskant. Ende der Geschichte.

                              Kommentar

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